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Carp's eyesight


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30 replies to this topic

#1
garysj01

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Hello everyone

I have been doing a lot of reading again, and have read a couple of interesting writings about carps eyesight.

Firstly apparently, a carps eyesight diminishes during the colder months making bait hard to see.

But it does start to regain its sight back when the weather warms up again.

Which is probably why the brightly coloured and flouro baits work better at the beginning of the year and start's to slow down during the progression of the year, that coupled with a carps danger association.

But colour greatly diminishes the deeper you go in water so yellow is not yellow in 16 feet of water which in part would render this theory useless.

What are your thought fella's

:D

#2
gazh

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My thoughts are quite simple, I have never used a brightly coloured bait for any of my carp fishing with the exception of the zig bugs that I tie myself. All my boilies are normally brown in colour and I rely on the carps olfactory system rather than their eyesight.

#3
travisbickle

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most effective winter baits have a white element to them...or dual colour...it has been this way in all of my carping since the early 80s.....these findings are ONLY on the waters I have fished obviously....but they remain to stand me in good stead decades later so will stick with it...my hookbaits in winter are always two tone( one part white or cream...the other can be any of the spectrum).....works for me....simple as that :wink:

#4
beza26

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I remember reading a few years ago and posting it on here something like anything under 12 degrees is cold to carp and starts affecting their eyesight. That's why I posted it, because if their eyesight is a lot worse why is the trend to scale down all your tackle, line, hooks etc. I don't change my setup apart from bait but hundreds of anglers must scale down in winter thinking its best to because of the clear water, but is there any need?

#5
adam77

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I remember Simon Scott saying in a thinking tackle episode that carp have good eye sight in clear water and the deeper they go there eye sight diminishes but they retain good contrast vision.

#6
beza26

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I remember Simon Scott saying in a thinking tackle episode that carp have good eye sight in clear water and the deeper they go there eye sight diminishes but they retain good contrast vision.


It was Simon Scott who wrote what I posted above lol

#7
woodchester17

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i was asking my boss some questions on this topic a while ago, he is head of science here and a biologist.

his take on it was there eyesight would be good at distance but due to where there eyes are located on the sides of the head they would have more or less no vision at all when something is directly infront of them.

#8
garysj01

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i was asking my boss some questions on this topic a while ago, he is head of science here and a biologist.

his take on it was there eyesight would be good at distance but due to where there eyes are located on the sides of the head they would have more or less no vision at all when something is directly infront of them.


They do have a blind spot right in front of them, but you have to remember i think i read some where the position of the eyes are more to do with predatory reason's rather than looking for food, i think they rely on other sense's where food is concerned, just my take fella :)

#9
blanksalot

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I've caught on black baits ,over silt, at night :shock:

I think they have infrared vision too :lol:

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#10
garysj01

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There has been a lot of speculation whether carp have any extra visionary aspects, maybe they do maybe they don't, i don't even think they can see in colour, only because its not needed by a carp. Even in black and white you can still see differences in colour, albeit shade

#11
gazh

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I remember reading a white paper on this many moons ago and they can tell that a carp can see in colour due to the number of rods and cones they have in their eyes. If I remember rightly blue is the colour that is most visible at depth but don't quote me on that, my memory isn't what it used to be :roll:

#12
jemsue5

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Personally i've found bait colour to make not one iota of difference at all.

#13
esh1989

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Personally i've found bait colour to make not one iota of difference at all.


On several equations I have swaped colour of my bait and it has paid off, Some mite say its coinscidence but I believe it works and its something I always try if the fish are not taking.

#14
salokcinnodrog

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I've not found that changing bait colour has made any positive difference to my fishing.

I've tried white baits in winter, as the top bait on a snowman, or on its own, and compared to the food bait topped with a dull bait, received fewer takes. This is one more than 1 water, clear lakes as well as coloured water.

In fact on Brackens, even a yellow piece of fake corn as the top bait has been ignored.

There is only 1 water that I can say that colour may have made any difference, and even then I can't be 100% as that water is or was heavily stocked. At times high visibility pop-ups score, but then that could be down to the overflavoured levels as well. Even on there, my food bait has scored over time in winter.


Now confidence may pay a big part in fishing, and I always do try a different colour bait at times, often as I fish my food bait so I can't say that I don't try it, yet most of my takes do still come to the dull coloured brown or red snowman bait.
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#15
dunkel

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From what I understand most fish that feed on the bottom (most of the time) have poor eyesight. Catfish and Carp have barbels for a reason. They feel and "taste" with them. Also Carp have little "hoods" around their nostrils that seem to move in all directions. Almost like little sattelite dishes that direct smells to their nostrils.
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#16
onefishmike

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I think that everyone could be mistaken because they are trying to compare fish and human vision.
Vision is simply the eyes' and brain's reaction to the light reflected by an object and the colour seen depends on the wavelength of the light, furthermore this wavelength is altered by the depth and turbidity of the water. Also human vision is restricted to a certain wavelength band and this band definitely varies among different living creatures.
A thought that provides deeper thinking on colour perception is night vision and here is the test, although no real need to try because you will all surely agree:
Put yourself in a chair in completely darkened room and allow 10 minutes for you night vision to optimise.
Stand up and walk to the door, which you will probably find because other senses come into play.
Now walk back to the middle of the room and turn around 2/3 times without counting - you are not likely to find the door!
A cat would always find the door - please just believe that!My personal view is that bait colours for carp are immaterial; day or night, summer or winter, deep or shallow - they know that the bait is there.
More important: Are the fish aware of anglers presence on the bank. I have just started a new thread about this - "Can they see us?"
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#17
pearbo

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i once read somewhere pink was the last colour to lose it's colour at depth is pink, i now don't use any other colour than flouro pink fake corn

#18
onefishmike

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i once read somewhere pink was the last colour to lose it's colour at depth is pink, i now don't use any other colour than flouro pink fake corn

I believe that fish see or detect baits irrespective of colour and, if the colour is unnatural or different from the other baits/food, it triggers either curiosity or warning signals.
I assume that you are using the fake corn with a boilie. In which case you are saying "This one is a bit different!" or "This one is dangerous" but I am NOT saying any more than that.
Have you ever tried fishing two rods side by side to compare results.
Personally I have never done well with artificial baits and only use them for good reason, e.g. a grain of plastic corn to pop-up the real stuff, and always as natural-looking as I can get it.
Interesting!
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#19
grangemilky

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Very pressured carp on my water regularly take high coloured artificial corn tipped baits over non coloured baits. I regularly fish both tipped and not in close proximity, and tipped out fishes non tipped.

My Conclusion: carp are attracted to bright colours, and do not associate it with danger, and It will be a long time before they do.

#20
nathanhuynh

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I get the same with small trout on my local river. In the colder months I use a bright pinkie hookbait but in the summer a worm does the job as well. (I think this may also be liked to the vibration though).




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