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dalej2014

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Everything posted by dalej2014

  1. This is an interesting concept; i wonder if it will "catch on"!? (sorry, couldn't resist the pun!). On a serious note do you think a small piece of cork on the bottom shank of the hook would help lift it and catch more? May be especially effective with a bottom bait or wafter, as the hook will fly up quicker? Just an idea/observation. I may have to test this rig, just out of curiosity!
  2. Just a thought but have you tried these? May be worth a look and trying? https://dnabaits.com/product-category/thebug/boilies-the-bug/
  3. So first of all I have to say I'm no top angler, but my fishing has improved a lot this year, and I've caught lots more. I only fish local club waters, I'm just an average working guy, and £30 a day, or hundreds and thousands for syndicates just aren't possible. I no longer turn up, do a pub chuck, then sit in the bivvy playing on my phone. (that didn't work too well!) The difference this year? Time and effort. I always look at the water now,, searching for signs of fish before casting. I'll do laps of the lake. I keep a note of when and where I see them. I use a marker rod to lead about, finding out what the bottom is like and the depths. I'll pick a rig that's likely to work on that bottom if I can't find a "spot". On that note I'm not the greatest caster, but I've made the effort to practise that as well. I'll move swims if I'm not feeling ti too, and try different things to see what works (and what doesn't). What works on one water, won't on another, so each lake has to be learned too. I also started making my own boilies this year. I buy the best ingredients I can, then turn up and bait the lakes regularly, so the fish get used to them. That also seems to be working well. As with tactics, bait seems to differ on different waters, and colours can make a difference as well. So even when not on the bank the effort is still there. I'm not baiting with a bag of boilies from my tackle shop. All the bait is fresh and hand rolled. I've also spent hours and hours on carp forums like this, learning all I can to improve my fishing. There are so many great tips here, and countless pearls of wisdom. For that I thank everyone who posts and shares their knowledge and wealth of experience. It really does help guys like me to catch more fish. So yeah, going back to the original question, time and effort. I suspect a lot of "top" people in anything find this true. Time + effort = reward. As a result I'm enjoying my fishing a lot more, and feel I'm getting more out of it. I turn up now expecting a catch, and my confidence is much improved. I will also say it is a journey, a marathon, not a sprint. it takes time and practise to improve in anything. Stay focused, spend time on the water. Try new things. And keep trying. My results haven't been worthy of Carpology or anything, but I've had a couple of dozen fish this year, mainly on short day sessions. I've caught some twenties. Caught fish from club lakes where I've never caught before, and caught on new waters, fished for the first time (twice within an hour of casting). I've caught from high pressure small lakes to mid stock 20 acres. All in all, it's been a belter of a year so far. And that from more time and effort. Most of all - enjoy it! (If you don't you'll chuck it in soon enough). Tight lines!
  4. Other pop up options. I use 5% cork dust to make wafters, 10% for pop ups. (Buy a litre of cork dust for a fiver off ebay). I just roll that into the base mix before boiling for a minute to 90 secs. I also balance bottom baits using kids foam shapes I buy from pond shops. This not only balances the bait (you do have to recheck balance after a night in the water), but also adds a visual "topper" that can help with some waters. basically acting like a snowman to balance the bait. Yellow foam can be good when you've baited with corn. You can also add cork once you've drilled out a bait too. Fox do a kit with drill and cork lengths to make "plugs". Just some ideas. I will be trying some of the flouro kits from AA sometime this year. Also, really like the sound of garlic spice @salokcinnodrog
  5. Ah. Good call. Didn't even occur. I thought the binders and heavier ingredients would help sink once mixed.
  6. And online - lots of insects to be ground into boilies - https://www.chubbymealworms.co.uk/products/5-litre-chubby-dried-black-soldier-fly-larvae?variant=24469171271&currency=GBP&utm_medium=product_sync&utm_source=google&utm_content=sag_organic&utm_campaign=sag_organic&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIhYLY49zu8QIV2e7tCh3sagCQEAQYASABEgKuWPD_BwE
  7. You could do worse than have a look in your local pet store or animal feed store. You should find lots of meal worms, larvae and grubs etc. there for reptiles. Just need to grind them up, and good to go. You'll find lots of info about boilie making online. I'm sure there's lots of info on this forum. That's a whole other can of worms! (Couldn't resist it!)
  8. Very nice! Just needs to see the water 😉
  9. Very nice! Just needs to see the water 😉
  10. Just treated myself to the Sonik 9' 3lb xtractor set, with 2 rods, 2 x 5000FS reels and the 42" net. So I had to get a transporter to put it in too. The idea is to travel light and make fishing fun again. I'll never be 15 again, tying a rod to my bike with a shoelace, but maybe I'll be wallking and stalking a bit more with these?
  11. Let me know how you get on with it please. Very interested. May just buy a spool anyway and see how I get on.
  12. Just asked for any opinions and reviews in the tackle section of this forum. If it's good as they claim it may be time for a respool!?
  13. Good shout. The "bible" of fishing lines. They update this quite regularly too. Latest issue - http://www.tacklebox.co.uk/pdfs/line_tests_issue12f.pdf Alas, no test of the new SubSonik line yet...
  14. have you thought about a 12v coolbox you can run and keep in your car? Obviously you'd need blocks etc. too, but if you're parked up behind your swim may work well for you? Halfords do some, along with camping places. I generally only fish short day sessions, so no real experience, just throwing the idea out there. Think outside the (cool) box! (sorry - I'll get my coat...)
  15. As the topic - anyone used the new subsonik line yet? The claims are bold; just wondering how it fares against the like of ESP loaded XT or Berkley CM90? Sonik get great reviews in other products, so I expect the line to be pretty good. If it lives upo to the marketing, exceptional perhaps? What do you think?
  16. Just a quick post to say Hi! New to this forum, but not to fishing. Fished a lot when younger then laid off it for many years. Returned a few years ago with a passion. I get on the bank as often as possible now (as work allows). Fishing various club waters in Suffolk and Essex. Biggest to date is a 22lb 9oz common, so now I'm after bigger fish! Anyway, good to be here. Look forward to reading the forums. Tight lines all.
  17. Very true. With a bit of practise you'll begin to feel the difference in various bottoms though. Gravel is very "tappy". Clay is hard but smooth. Sand/silt and silk week can be tricky. easier to feel with your fingers on the line, than reeling in. Weed you'll find stops you dead if heavy. etc. etc. I also smell the lead (at need), once retrieved - sounds and looks weird, no doubt, but you can smell silt on the lead! Fine "hair" weed/algae will usually cling to it. Sand will come out clear. There are some decent videos on Youtube,, but to be honest it's like riding a bike. Someone can tell you how to do it, but you won't know how to, until you've done it yourself. I second the comment re. a stiffer rod. It gives you much more feel when leading about. If you can, practise in the margins or in a gin clear water. It takes a while to get the hang of, but is absolutely worth the time and effort. Your leading rod will soon become your "eyes" on the lake bed. Good luck!
  18. Try using a heavier lead first, before looking at another rod. You should find you get a better drop and more feel with a heavy lead. I use a 4 or 5oz lead on my spod rod (4.5lb tc) with braid. Works well. In a really weedy lake I'd stay well away from grappler leads. I find the "bumpy" ones work best. With that size lead make sure you use a decent stall too.
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