Jump to content
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble

ruup4it

Member
  • Content Count

    7
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  1. Weils Disease Weil’s Disease is a bacterial infection caused by the Leptospirosis bacterium, and is spread by the urine of rats. Now that summer is with us these vermin will be proliferating like mad, spreading the risk of infection far and wide. The bacteria usually enter your body via cuts to the skin, or via the nose, mouth and alimentary tract. Thus anyone coming into contact with or swallowing infected water will be at risk. Note that infected water does not have to look iffy to pose a risk. However, water, which does appear polluted, or the sight of rats on the bankside or in the water, is a strong warning that the water is probably contaminated. As anglers we cannot avoid coming into contact with contaminated water but you should be aware that the problem exists. An attack of Weil’s Disease usually resembles a cold or flu in its early stages. The incubation period is 3-21 days but can be longer (up to 30 days or even longer) in some extreme cases. The early signs are a yellowing of the skin and eyes, which indicates the onset of jaundice and shows that the infection has affected the liver. At this stage several diagnoses are possible including glandular fever and hepatitis. However, a blood test will reveal if Weil’s Disease is the culprit. Further symptoms include: · Severe pain in joints and muscles throughout the body but more noticeable in the arms, elbows, wrists, legs, shoulders, hips, knees and ankles. · Stiff and painful neck. · Constipation. · Very dry mouth and throat. · Nausea. · Headache. · Unable to sleep due to pain and general discomfort. · Elevated pulse rate and blood pressure. · Loss of appetite. · Urine a peculiar colour. · Severe fever. · Occasional violent shivering fits. · Sudden yet prolonged spells of profuse sweating with consequent dehydration. · Dry unproductive cough. · Occasional shortness of breath. The initial illness lasts about 5-10 days. In some cases it can then appear to get better but a further significant deterioration inevitably follows. If untreated Weil’s Disease is very serious and can, on occasions, be fatal. If you become ill after a fishing trip and display any of the above flu-like symptoms, it is vital that you contact a doctor as soon as possible. You must tell the treating physician that you may have been in contact with infected water and that you suspect Weil’s Disease, as many of them do not associate the symptoms with the Disease without some guidance from you, the patient. Treatment is invariably with strong antibiotics and it is usually successful but ONLY if it is started rapidly after the symptoms develop. Here are just a few ways the bacteria can enter the body: 1. Swallowing infected water. 2. Allowing infected water into contact with the eyes, nasal passages , the throat and the alimentary canal. 3. Via cuts and broken skin (grazes etc). 4. From contaminated food left uneaten either on the ground or even on a low chair or your bivvy table. Who knows what ratty has been up to while you were sleeping? 5. From a cigarette that may have fallen to the ground or by smoking a cigarette from packet left on the ground where a rat may have passed urine under or on the packet overnight or while you were away from your swim. 6. By lubricating your knots with saliva. 7. By biting rather than cutting nylon line. 8. By not being aware that wet boots and waders (especially neoprene chesties that retain water for much longer) will carry the infection until they are entirely dried out 9. By licking your fingers while fishing. 10. by kissing your fish you have just captured Take all necessary precautions. I know they are a bind but they could save your life. · Get rid of rats using poison where possible. Use traps and plenty of them to help decrease the numbers around the fishery but be aware that even after they are dead their potential for harm lives on in the urine they have deposited. · Encourage all private fishery owners to take extreme measures against them. They have a legal responsibility to provide a healthy environment for you to fish in. · If you kill a rat one don't touch it with unprotected hands. · Cover all cuts and broken skin with waterproof plasters while fishing. Always wash your hands before eating, drinking or smoking. · Report ANY flu like illness to your doctor.
  2. ruup4it

    fish photo

    hey salokcinnodrog i bet you wont be kissing any more fish after reading this buddy Weil’s Disease is a bacterial infection caused by the Leptospirosis bacterium, and is spread by the urine of rats. Now that summer is with us these vermin will be proliferating like mad, spreading the risk of infection far and wide. The bacteria usually enter your body via cuts to the skin, or via the nose, mouth and alimentary tract. Thus anyone coming into contact with or swallowing infected water will be at risk. Note that infected water does not have to look iffy to pose a risk. However, water, which does appear polluted, or the sight of rats on the bankside or in the water, is a strong warning that the water is probably contaminated. As anglers we cannot avoid coming into contact with contaminated water but you should be aware that the problem exists. An attack of Weil’s Disease usually resembles a cold or flu in its early stages. The incubation period is 3-21 days but can be longer (up to 30 days or even longer) in some extreme cases. The early signs are a yellowing of the skin and eyes, which indicates the onset of jaundice and shows that the infection has affected the liver. At this stage several diagnoses are possible including glandular fever and hepatitis. However, a blood test will reveal if Weil’s Disease is the culprit. Further symptoms include: · Severe pain in joints and muscles throughout the body but more noticeable in the arms, elbows, wrists, legs, shoulders, hips, knees and ankles. · Stiff and painful neck. · Constipation. · Very dry mouth and throat. · Nausea. · Headache. · Unable to sleep due to pain and general discomfort. · Elevated pulse rate and blood pressure. · Loss of appetite. · Urine a peculiar colour. · Severe fever. · Occasional violent shivering fits. · Sudden yet prolonged spells of profuse sweating with consequent dehydration. · Dry unproductive cough. · Occasional shortness of breath. The initial illness lasts about 5-10 days. In some cases it can then appear to get better but a further significant deterioration inevitably follows. If untreated Weil’s Disease is very serious and can, on occasions, be fatal. If you become ill after a fishing trip and display any of the above flu-like symptoms, it is vital that you contact a doctor as soon as possible. You must tell the treating physician that you may have been in contact with infected water and that you suspect Weil’s Disease, as many of them do not associate the symptoms with the Disease without some guidance from you, the patient. Treatment is invariably with strong antibiotics and it is usually successful but ONLY if it is started rapidly after the symptoms develop. Here are just a few ways the bacteria can enter the body: 1. Swallowing infected water. 2. Allowing infected water into contact with the eyes, nasal passages , the throat and the alimentary canal. 3. Via cuts and broken skin (grazes etc). 4. From contaminated food left uneaten either on the ground or even on a low chair or your bivvy table. Who knows what ratty has been up to while you were sleeping? 5. From a cigarette that may have fallen to the ground or by smoking a cigarette from packet left on the ground where a rat may have passed urine under or on the packet overnight or while you were away from your swim. 6. By lubricating your knots with saliva. 7. By biting rather than cutting nylon line. 8. By not being aware that wet boots and waders (especially neoprene chesties that retain water for much longer) will carry the infection until they are entirely dried out 9. By licking your fingers while fishing. Take all necessary precautions. I know they are a bind but they could save your life. · Get rid of rats using poison where possible. Use traps and plenty of them to help decrease the numbers around the fishery but be aware that even after they are dead their potential for harm lives on in the urine they have deposited. · Encourage all private fishery owners to take extreme measures against them. They have a legal responsibility to provide a healthy environment for you to fish in. · If you kill a rat one don't touch it with unprotected hands. · Cover all cuts and broken skin with waterproof plasters while fishing. Always wash your hands before eating, drinking or smoking. · Report ANY flu like illness to your doctor.
  3. ruup4it

    otters kill again at willington lakes

    trying to do another link for u now buddy
  4. ruup4it

    otters kill again at willington lakes

    might be ur pop up blocker thought of that ???
  5. ruup4it

    otters kill again at willington lakes

    cant do anything as otters are protected but if you set a fox trap and a otter goes in it then yes you can move it other wise you have to put a wirelink chain fence in and bury the bottom of it about 2 foot down and just above ground a 2 or 3 wire electric fence all around the lake thats all you can do try here buddy http://www.adobe.com/support/downloads/product.jsp?product=10&platform=Windows
  6. http://www.shefforddaa.org.uk/pdf_files/Willington%20Lake%20Otter%20Victims.pdf its a sad day again as lost two great fish there BEWARE PICTURES NOT NICE
×