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Steaming or Boiling!


ghost101
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Steaming Or boiling?  

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  1. 1. Steaming Or boiling?

    • Steaming
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    • Boiling
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Hello

 

I have been rolling my own boilies for a little while now both my own mixes and ready made mixes.

 

I have been wondering whether it would be better to steam or boil boilies as i have heard mix view.

 

Firstly what are the Advantages and disadvantages of each, what sort of times would i be looking at to steam?

 

Furthermore when steaming a good amount of boilies in one go, obviously the baits closest to the steam cook quicker than the ones furthest away, can this make the difference of having a boilie that will last in the water and one that wont last long, and what would be the best way to steam a kilo or 2 at a time but keeping consistency throughout the batch.

 

Has anyone made a homemade steamer for big hits?

 

Lastly how many litres would you need to boil a kilo of boilies without taking it off the boil?

 

Thanks

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I might be wrong but i vaguely remember a magazine article where the basemix was rolled into different shapes before being wrapped in cling film and then immersed in boiliing water for a short period of time to produce "steamies" .

Looked just like boilies but without the toughened skin making the flavours leak out quicker.

Ideal for shorter sessions , as someone gas already stated .

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Lastly how many litres would you need to boil a kilo of boilies without taking it off the boil?

 

The water will go off the boil because you are adding quite a lot of cold material to the water. When water boils it has reached its maximum temperature, anything over boiling point turns into steam and vapour.

 

It's not the amount of water that counts, it the size of your heater, I'm not sure if a chip pan would be better; not a stove top but one with a built in thermostat, you can get them quite cheap new or second hand. But as I said I'm sure sure if it is better or not I haven't tried it.

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I have just have a go at making a one egg mix and steam half and boil the other half.

 

This a few things i noticed pretty quickly:

 

Steaming:

-The steamed baits where alot stronger smelling and smelt pretty much the same as the paste mix, so you could get away with using less flavours etc

-I steamed my 16mm for 5mins in a vegetable steamer, and they still had a nice most centre like a boilie, could probably even bring that 5 mins down to 4 or even 3mins

-You can steam alot more baits in the same size container, great for those big quantities, and then potentially make bait alot quicker.

-more economical

 

 

I have got a few baits in some water to see what the break downs are like and leakage.

 

what do you think about steaming baits, is it worth it, does it help get the most out of you bait?

 

thanks

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A couple of months ago the other half bought a Actifry by Tefal. one of those new gizmos that cooks chips with only a table spoon of oil. For the record the chips ain't bad.

 

Anyhow the actual system works by pumping very hot air into the cooking compartment which heats the food and the oil the oil then coats the food and it cooks. There is also a paddle in the middle that moves around to constantly move the food.

 

Sometimes we cook some food without any oil as it has some fat content itself. So it actually go tme thinking about boilies (or whatever they would be called).

 

As the point of boiling the bait is to harden/bind them, set the egg and form a skin around the paste. I don't see any reason why that wouldn't happen in this new gadget. The only thing that would worry me we be about drying the bait out or heating it to much with the drying process and finding them brittle etc etc.

 

I am not going to try in her new toy, but in principle what do you guys think, would it work?

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Guest Nhawkeye

You're better off just boiling the baits mate. It's a lot less complicated and it'll make no difference to your catch rates whatsoever. I know of a lad who swore by steaming, but, he soon went back to boiling for the reasons I've stated.

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personally i reckon steaming hookbaits is ok as like has been said the smell is much stronger than a boilied bait. the reason for not steaming the whole batch is that the bait needs to be steamed for longer and in a higher temperature which although does not affect the smell of the bait it will de-nature the bait more than boiling in my opinion. so boil the freebies and steam the hookbaits

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Guest Nhawkeye

Well for the sake of having "stronger" smelling boilies for the use of hookbaits, because, they will have a little bit more attraction, why not just use a paste wrap?

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Well for the sake of having "stronger" smelling boilies for the use of hookbaits, because, they will have a little bit more attraction, why not just use a paste wrap?
you can do mate yeah. but im with you mate, just boil them. if it was that much better to steam the bait wouldnt all the bait firms be doing it :? . roll em, boil em then freeze em. easy :)
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Guest Nhawkeye
you can do mate yeah. but im with you mate, just boil them. if it was that much better to steam the bait wouldnt all the bait firms be doing it :? . roll em, boil em then freeze em. easy :)

 

Yeah, exactly :)

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ok what size burco would i need to be able to boil a kilo roughly at one time.

 

Im currently doing it in a deep fat fryer that holds around 5l off water, and can probably only do around 200-300g at a time if that, i am looking for a way to cook atleast a kilo at a time but also not cost alot for equipment and still get a good bait at the end of it.

 

But surely if steamed vegetables retain more goodness wont your bait, as long as the steam doesnt get pressurised the steam is only going to be around 100c, and as it isnt in direct contact with the water so those valuble soluble ingredients and vitamins dont get washed out

 

Also i did my 16mm for 5 mins and i think if i did around 3mins or maybe even less that would be perfect, so there wont be exposed to temp much longer and in some cases the same amount of time as boiling. i put 1 steam 1 boilie in seperate water and after around 20-30mins there was already a 2-3mm band at the bottom surrounding the steam bait, and as more of the liquid has stayed in there it should keep attracting for around the same amount of time, but you have the add bonus of it leaking out attraction straight away, great for a quick bite.

 

I have seen someone use a "wallpaper steamer" , a large plastic box and tray, and made a homemade steamer which could do 2.5k at a time, and if u already got a steamer it wont cost nothing.

 

Surely if you have a good steamer setup and it only needs 2-3mins steaming there cant be any big disadvantage to using a steamer, has anyone fished a steam vs a boiled next to each other on same spot etc, if so how you get on.

 

thanks

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Guest Nhawkeye

16mm baits boiled for 5 minutes is way too long and boiling 300g of bait at a time has no benefits.

 

Also, comparing vegetables to boilies, is literally like comparing chalk and cheese. A vegetable is a vegetable and is in it's natural state.

 

A boilie is concoction of ingredients, that has been designed for boiling in water. Bear in mind, when boilies are placed in water, the water is at a high temperature and are instantly "skinned". No matter if you steam, or boil in water, some of the attractors will always be lost. But, what you're doing by boiling 16mm baits for 5 mins is almost destroying the attractors.

 

To boil, or even steam a kilo of bait, would require a machine of industrial proportions.

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16mm baits boiled for 5 minutes is way too long and boiling 300g of bait at a time has no benefits.

 

Also, comparing vegetables to boilies, is literally like comparing chalk and cheese. A vegetable is a vegetable and is in it's natural state.

 

A boilie is concoction of ingredients, that has been designed for boiling in water. Bear in mind, when boilies are placed in water, the water is at a high temperature and are instantly "skinned". No matter if you steam, or boil in water, some of the attractors will always be lost. But, what you're doing by boiling 16mm baits for 5 mins is almost destroying the attractors.

 

To boil, or even steam a kilo of bait, would require a machine of industrial proportions.

 

 

I have heard people being able to boil around 1kilo at a time in burcos, i was wondering what size i would need to do that, is it around 30-40L.

 

I Steamed my 16mm for 5 mins not boiled them, as i heard 3min and 8 mins where times ppl where doing theres but if i steam again i will drop it to 2-3mins. i boil my bait for around 90 seconds

 

Isnt there much difference between boiling and steaming then, as i want to be able to boil/steam a good quantity at a time as it currently takes ages, and i could make a homemade steamer cheaper than getting a burco or something similiar.

 

thanks

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Guest Nhawkeye

Isn't a burco a kettle, like the ones used in a works canteen?

 

I can't see how that can save you money, the electricity meter will be whizzing round! Unless, I'm thinking of something else, of course. :oops:

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Isn't a burco a kettle, like the ones used in a works canteen?

 

I can't see how that can save you money, the electricity meter will be whizzing round! Unless, I'm thinking of something else, of course. :oops:

 

 

Yer pretty much, a lot of people seem to use them when there are making bulk boilies at home.

 

Surely the cost of running one of those is another plus for Steaming. I was wondering surely seen as steaming doesnt take much longer 1-2mins longer than boiling, and as it not at a higher temperature than boiling it not going to denature the bait that much surely.

 

Surely steaming has the advantages:

-Keeps more nutrients etc

-keeps more flavour and doesnt was the bait out as much (so you can get away with using less liquid or addictives)

-able to cook/skin a lot more bait in one go

-Able to make bait quicker as doesnt take as long to get steaming, you can get more done in one go

-More economical

- the baits still skin and retain a moist centre like a boilie

-requires less air drying time

 

 

When you say "boiling is a lot less complicated and fuss" what exactly do you mean what have people found that makes steaming not worth it.

 

thanks

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Guest Nhawkeye
Link don't work :roll:

 

Damn, sorry. I'll take a look and try it again :oops:

 

Weird, I just looked at the address and it's right, can't understand why it's not working. :shock:

 

But, I just typed on Bing, A Critical View on Steaming and the page came up :?

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First off I'll say this. You will not catch more carp with steamed baits, in fact, your catch rates will suffer.

 

But, to save me writing a lot of words to explain why, take a look at this:

http://www.mainline-baits.com/Mainline-Articles/

 

Hi

 

I have read that before and read a debate over that, like when they compare the inside of a steam to a boiled, that not how many people do theirs and what do you expect when you are heating it for longer than you need just like what would happen if you did boiles for longer.

 

Also another reason that they might have not caught as quickly or as well is as the steaming doesnt wash out the flavours etc the flavours are going to be stronger and depending what you use in your mix too much could put the carp of, and their mix has been design to be boiled, but if your using only liquid foods you would be ok.

 

 

I am just looking for a few disadvantage and advantages for steaming and boiling, so i can either get something to boil more at a time or try steaming, at the moment no one has really given a explantion to why steaming isnt the way to go, from what i have seen from my batch and read i think steaming could be a good economical way to skin your baits, and also keeps more of them soluble attractors and liquids in so has more to leak out, and it therefore going to be more attractive.

 

But it seems that people are put off the idea of it coz it a fuss and takes longer yet it take longer to get the water for boilies going that it does the little amount needed for steam, and it seems that steaming times are very close to the time for boilies, so your not going to be denaturing the bait and keeping all those goodies in that you have put in your mix.

 

thanks

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So this may well be shot down straight away but I use a combo of an air dried paste bait and a microwaved / dipped bait..... It's working so far. I read on another thread here to put some water in an egg cup in with the micowaved baits to stop the burning (it does but you need to cook them longer, so not sure on the benifit) but by mistake dropped a bait into to the tub of water. This made a boilie but in a shorter time than on the hob.... Has any one else tried this? I have read that you can heat water in a microwave that is super hot but not boil and then spontaneously boil when moved.... So be careful if you try this! This super hot effect can happen when re heating a hot drink as well.....

 

I don't do kilos at a time but when I do make boilies I use a fryer filled with water, keeps the heat a lot better than on the hob, the fuse box does trip out sometimes though, :oops:

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Guest Nhawkeye

I never used an electrical fryer, because, using one to make boilies seems totally impractical; plus, they literally drink electricity!

 

I always used an old style deep fat fryer on a gas hob. Basically, all it is, is a large saucepan that comes with a basket. The basket is ideal for lowering a set amount of bait into boiling water all at once.

 

To the asker of the original question.

 

You seem convinced that steamed baits are better than boiled. I'm sorry, but, you're wrong mate. You're better off going down the road of steaming baits and finding out for yourself.

 

I'm not saying this for the sake of it, I'm saying this, because, it's true.

 

Steaming baits is just a crazy fad, that has absolutely no benefits to the finished bait, the carp, or, the angler's catch results whatsoever.

 

The steamed baits may look good, smell good, but, it's not the human palate that you have to convince. Steamed baits just don't have any staying power once introduced into a lake. The smell goes quicker, they turn to mush quicker and tend to take on the taste of silt and pondweed far more readily than a standard boiled bait. Furthermore, tests by many anglers have shown that steamed baits are far less palatable, as catch results have shown.

 

Like I said, see for yourself, but, I guarantee you'll come to realise that steaming baits is a complete waste of time money and effort.

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ok thanks

 

I guess i will just stick with boiling, but the problem i face is i am using a elecrtic fryer that holds around 5-5,5l of water and it doesnt boil enough boilies at a time and i am looing for a way of boiling atleast 500g-750g at one time

 

what would be the best way of doing this without the use of a burco as they are bit expensive for me and use a fair amount of electricity.

 

 

Thanks

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Guest Nhawkeye

Just use an old style deep fat fryer on the hob. It's basically a large saucepan with a basket. I'm not one of those people who liked to boil large quantities at a time, because, I believe that the water temperature lowers too much, which, in turn can effect the quality of the finished bait.

 

Another thing though, if you have access to a garage, or large shed, you could use those large catering cooking pots. Some pots come with a large basket, that have sections placed at different heights.

 

Put a certain amount of boilies in each section and then lower the basket into the pot. However, I'm of the opinion when working with so much boiling water, you shouldn't do it alone.

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Yer i was thinking of getting a large pot like a stock pot etc, not sure on the size though i think 20l would be ok?, then i would have to get a gas burner or something so i can do it out side to avoid smelling the house out :lol:

 

Would a gas burner and a bottle of butane be ok or is there anything else that would be better or cheaper to buy and run.

 

 

Thanks

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