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Slack line Bite sensitivity


ghost101
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Hello

 

I have been fishing Slack lines now for a few years, but over the last few session i have done i have had a little bit more concern on the sensitivity of it as i only seem to get a few bleeps on the alarm, and not very good positive takes, and the fish seems to snag me up very quickly after the first indication, and i had a few weird pickups aswell and i was thinking that i may be missing or being done because of it.

 

like i said i have been using slack lines for a few years and dont think i could go back to tight lines after seeing a tight line rig presentation in the margins. i am making sure i let plenty of line out give it plenty of time to sink and have rods tips up, i am also using lightest muddy water bobbins and nash d-cam mainline, ( i feel like i need to change to something more heavier)

 

Can anyone give me any advice on how to inprove bite sensitivity, as i feel i maybe missing takes etc?

 

Also any other tips of just how to make sure i set up slack line would be great?

 

thanks

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I can mirror your concerns, I think I'm missing a lot of indications because of it. Can think of quite a few times this year when I've had either a single bleep or nothing at all yet one of the lines is entering the water 4 feet further out than it was when I set it. Not undertow before someone says it.

 

I used to leave the line slack for a good 20-30 mins then slowly pull it in until the hanger would sit where I wanted it without it pulling in more slack - you end up with a semi slack line that enters the water much lower than a tight line like back leading past the drop off.

 

I guess I've got half the line on the bottom minimum, and obviously far better indication. I also think that the reel comes into play much quicker which obviously pulls the hook in more = more proper runs.

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If a fish is snagging you up after just a couple of beeps then your fishing a swim where slack lines shouldnt be used,

If its shaggy or weedy then don't bother with them at all.

 

I've found a heavy running lead to be best for indication.

 

to be honest I think a lot of people have been brainwashed into thinking slack lines must be used at all times, I now tend to fish semi-slack, and have found indication to be a lot better

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Hello

 

thanks for the replies and suggestion, i think i will have to give semi slack lines a go.

 

Has anyone got any tips advice on the best best way to set it up, like

how tight do you need it

is it best to have the tips high but not too high

is it best to have a heavy lead on

bobbin weight and drop etc

 

 

Also would anyone recommend a heavier mainline to the nash d-cam?

 

 

thanks

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firstly to me you should never fish slcak lines anywhere near snags. the amount of people that see a rig in the margins and think "oh god look at that" do you think that looks the same and fish see it the same when in 5 10 or 15 foot of water? a few people on my syndi insist on slack lines and lose so many more fish than the rest of us. i am trying to get the bloke that runs it to actually ban slack line fishing on one of the lakes because of the snags. a few of us have raised concerns about the amount of fish getting to the snags and most of the time its with the people fishing slack. you dont have to fish bow string tight. once cast out and the rig has settled just pull enough line off the spool to take the stretch out and a little more so it is semi slack, you wont get better sensitivity than that tbh

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I would only fish slack if i was fishing the margins, and tighter the further i fish at range. Running leads are the way forward for good indication, even fishing a semi slack line you'll be surprised how much of the line is laying on the bottom. If your fishing snags, tight lines, locked clutches, and don't do it at night.

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I have seen fish move 20 or 30 yards on slack line choddies without a single bleep. if u wanna fish semi slack i really cant see how u cant use delkims to pick up vibrations as well. then again i never do, i like a 8 inch drop on the hanger with pretty much tightish lines, never seems to make a difference and with delkims they pick up very early indications, important when snag fishing i think, there is no point risking snagging the fish up and possibly doing damage, they bleep, hit em and hold.

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I have seen fish move 20 or 30 yards on slack line choddies without a single bleep. if u wanna fish semi slack i really cant see how u cant use delkims to pick up vibrations as well. then again i never do, i like a 8 inch drop on the hanger with pretty much tightish lines, never seems to make a difference and with delkims they pick up very early indications, important when snag fishing i think, there is no point risking snagging the fish up and possibly doing damage, they bleep, hit em and hold.
semi slack then. take the stretch out of the line and there you have semi slack really. dont need delkims for it at all tbh. i have seen fish kite 40 yards with delk txi's and fox rx digitals (which also have vibrate) by taking the slack out of the line a fish needs to tighten up against the reel to start the line stretching, by doing that you would USUALLY get good indication, couple that with running lead even better
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Thats all very well saying NOT to fish with slack lines in snaggy swims but you have to Be aware of the snags in the first place .

I fished a swim for the first time last week and had 2 fish in 2 days reach 2 different snags in 2 diffrent parts of the swim without ANY indication whatsoever from either alarms or hangers .

So i wont be doing THAT again .

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i agree running leads do give a better indication when using slacker lines but im more confident fishing a semi fixed. my rigs are very basic (had an awesome season so doesn't seem to matter) and i believe very often it is my lead that nails em before any fancy rig. had a fair few catfish this year too and a good 90% of the time the bites are so cute, a 3 bleep drop back from a 30lber for instance. as for delkims i might as well be an unpaid delkim salesman lol, wouldn't change em, so versatile. can uderstand why people dont wanna spend 2 weeks money on something that goes bleep though.

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I tend to fish slack lines, but only ever with a totally free running lead. I don't think that with a semi-fixed lead that you ever get as much indication at the rod end, and I have seen fish move a long way with no indication at the buzzer or hanger/climber, although the line angle at the rod tip from original position has moved.

 

My method of running lead is with a big run ring and a 3oz, and allowing the line to become totally slack from rod tip to lakebed, with the indicator at maximum drop, hanging straight down (I use Quiverlocs). This method works for me from margin fishing, to fishing around 80metres (not had much need to cast any further, so can't comment on its long range effectiveness).

 

It can take around 20minutes for the line to become totally slack after casting, and you may need to keep on pulling additional line off the reel after casting a few times until it is totally slack.

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Thanks ian

 

Nick , how do you think slacklining with your running lead set up compares to if , for example , you was fishing the same set up only with tight lines ?

 

Strangely enough, I use the same set-up for slack line fishing as I do with tight lines.

 

In November and January, conditions on the lagoons were such with such strong undertow and currents that I had to fish very tight lines just to stop them taking hold of the line. On both sessions I ended up with fish.

 

I have had the same on Brackens, needing to fish a tight line and catching.

 

On both waters, my favoured approach was with slack lines, and on Brackens I have caught plenty of fish like that.

 

With the slack line, I think that on a take, the lead stays in place, and line is pulled through the water as if it is in a tube, until all the slack is pulled up. As soon as any line is taken through the run ring I believe that you get indication, whether the fish is running towards or away; you simply wind down and 'strike' into the fish.

 

On a tight line, I believe the same set-up becomes semi-fixed, the fish is then able to dropback or run, so you need to be able to have a drop on your indicator.

 

I hope that explains it, I can't always put thoughts into words

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Thanks for the advice,

 

So to fish semi slack, is it best to cast out and and let enough line off to get the line to lay on the bottom for a good percent of the distance fished, then once left to sink for 20-30min or sunken etc, turn the spool to take up the extra slack and then keep going till you put a slight curve in the line that drops down from the tip, that way you are fishing semi slack.

 

Is it best to fish semi slack with rod tips high, slightly high, level or low?

 

Secondary as i am fishing a weedy water with silt, lillies and few weed beds here and there, is there any way to fish a running lead that drop off, so it safe to fish in weed etc.

 

thanks

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what i dont get is that no one seems to worry about undertow when slack lining, so you let line off every couple of mons for 10 mins or so. 10 yards of line in undertow meaning ten yards of line going away from rig, NO indication until the fish has picked that ten yards up and connected with the bobbin/alarm, SNAGGED AND MAYBE DEAD FISH

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what i dont get is that no one seems to worry about undertow when slack lining, so you let line off every couple of mons for 10 mins or so. 10 yards of line in undertow meaning ten yards of line going away from rig, NO indication until the fish has picked that ten yards up and connected with the bobbin/alarm, SNAGGED AND MAYBE DEAD FISH

 

Mate i have always had this concern myself, i have written about undertow, i just think the more you pay out the more the undertow will take, just imagine fishing slack lines on a river :shock:

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what i dont get is that no one seems to worry about undertow when slack lining, so you let line off every couple of mons for 10 mins or so. 10 yards of line in undertow meaning ten yards of line going away from rig, NO indication until the fish has picked that ten yards up and connected with the bobbin/alarm, SNAGGED AND MAYBE DEAD FISH

 

Mate i have always had this concern myself, i have written about undertow, i just think the more you pay out the more the undertow will take, just imagine fishing slack lines on a river :shock:

i just cant understand people using slack lines, especially on snaggy waters
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Gaz , the more i think about it the more im tending to agree with you especially after what happened on my last session . My line was SO slack that the fish were snagged up before i even knew i had a take.

 

I dont think i'll fish slack again unless i'm certain that i know that particular swim inside out , which in effect probably means never !

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