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Carp Care For Beginners


garysj01
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91537760-0c78-406b-b9ab-4e92a35c171d_zpsaed2b174.jpg

 

Carp care is one of those aspects of carp fishing that should be taken seriously as we all have a responsibility to look after the quarry we fish for, especially the bigger species like Carp, Pike, Catfish, Sturgeon and Zander.

I still to this day see fishermen using inadequate gear for the job, and regularly see anglers using nets that are to small for the species they are fishing for. Sometimes being dragged up the bank and then set on to hard ground, without any consideration for the fish what so ever.

So I am setting out to cover some of the essentials that you should have before you even think about going fishing.

 

First and foremost I would like to cover Landing Nets, it is your responsibility to ensure you have a landing net that is big enough for the job. At the very least you should be using a 36 inch net, here I have a 42 inch net, that is more than capable of handling bigger carp.

a1d1d230-c53e-4ab7-ab7b-0c921ad71a68_zpsc8a6b757.jpg

If you are Sturgeon or Catfishing you might want to consider using a 50 inch net.

Now I usually try to unhook the fish in the net even before I think of lifting the fish before an Unhooking Mat. If I can not unhook the fish I will careful run my hand under the fish to make sure all of the fins are facing towards the back of the fish. If the fins are left sticking out from the fish you are running the risk of getting them caught in the net and possibly breaking the fins. Take hold of the net at the spreader block with one hand and the front of the net with the other and gently lift the fish up and out of the water. Making sure the fins are all facing toward the back of the fish, and gently lower down on to your unhooking mat.

That leads me nicely on to unhooking mats, there is no excuse these days, you can buy unhooking mats in various sizes nowadays for very little money. It is not acceptable to be just using a towel, especially with the bigger species. Always make sure that your mat is wet, you don't want to be putting a large fish down on to a dry mat, this can take away some of the fishes protective mucus.

c5b9fff5-2a3b-411e-8ff1-c7c90aa84cf8_zpse8f8b3b2.jpg

You should always have a bucket to hand full of lake water, to pour over the fish while it is laying on the mat. This is the one I use, its really a expander bait bucket, but it holds a lot of water and is easy to fold up and pack away into my rod quiver. You must keep this fish wet at all times. If this fish starts to flap around while on the mat, you can just simply cover its head with either part of the unhooking mat or just place your hand gently over the eye, until the fish calms down. The next items I would like to run through are the unhooking tools. These are the two tools I use for removing hooks.

87e1af8f-8383-4bc0-95f6-10ae0a818ee7_zps7e224f0f.jpg

I use these tools as they give me better purchase when unhooking fish. The long nose pliers are for unhooking the fish and the cutters are for cutting through the hooks. So much damage is done to fishes mouths through anglers, and all you have to do is just use a bit of common sense, if the hook has gone all the way through the mouth of the fish then just cut the hook in half. Remember your priority is to fishes welfare, hooks are a few pence each.

d15c8ab9-b025-4d8d-aeaa-100bbc849f22_zpsda5fbc2b.jpg

The bottle in the picture is fish antiseptic, this should be used if the fish has either spawning damage to scales, any cuts or grazes and should be used on the wound the hook has caused. In all honesty hook holes usually heal themselves, but I certainly doesn't hurt to put some on just in case. If I saw a scale missing or any cuts and grazes to a fish I would squeeze some of the antiseptic on to the area and gently rub into the wound. As for mouth damage I just find it easier to use these cotton buds. Just squeeze a little antiseptic on to the cotton bud and treat the area, inside and out if necessary.

If you are not weighing the fish then, again, make sure all of the fins are facing towards the tail end of the fish and return to the water in your landing net. Do not pick up the fish to return as the fish may flap around causing you to drop the fish on to the ground. Whilst the fish is in the water take hold of the tail and gently hold the fish in the upright position until the fish either kicks or feels strong enough to release. Do not just put the fish back into the water and hope for the best.

None of these tools have to be expensive, but we all have a duty to care for the fish we catch for future generations to come.

That's it for now, that is the essential kit guide for the newcomer to the sport, if you are a little unsure of what you are doing try to go with someone who is more experienced and let them show you how to look after our fish.

It is also worth a mention that if dipping tanks are supplied, it is your responsibility to use these tanks and dip all of your carp care gear.

When you get all of your gear home you should wash it all down with clean water and leave out in the sun to dry as the UV rays will kill most of the parasites, associated with harming fish.

These days the carp care gear isn't expensive and is often over looked by a lot of anglers. Before you rush out to buy your first rod and reel you must take into consideration the fish you are angling for, and purchase some of these items to protect the fish for future generations.

 

Next time i will move on to weighing and handling fish, until then, be lucky

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...

Great post and sound advice on the care and welfare for the fish we catch. I think the use of antiseptic on wounds is a fantastic idea and I for one will be adding it to my tackle box for all future fishing.

 

I personally always use a wet cotton tea towel to handle the fish and as you say covering there eyes certainly helps to keep the fish calm while unhooking. look forward to your next carp care post... :)

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  • 7 months later...
  • 4 months later...

I would not use a tea towel.  Every fish as a protective mucus that helps prevent parasites, protects against disease when injured and is part of the Osmoregulation process.

 

The above is the reason after 20 years of fishing I still don't mess about trying to get a photo.  If possible I unhook in landing net in the water to prevent stress/lack of oxygen (sometimes not possible because of the hook hold) Less time on the bank = healthier fish, it is that simple. 

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  • 1 month later...

I have just bought a new 42" landing net off the bay for about £12 and free delivery.

It's got a nice tight mesh on the bottom and a nice open mesh throughout the rest, it's spreader block is a bit on the poor side but i've already whipped the female part to strengthen it.

My beanie unhooking mat is on it's way, once again off the bay and that only cost £15 including delivery.

So, carp care really isn't expensive at all and it's a neccesity.

 

Great post by the way.

 

Andy

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  • 4 months later...

91537760-0c78-406b-b9ab-4e92a35c171d_zpsCarp care is one of those aspects of carp fishing that should be taken seriously as we all have a responsibility to look after the quarry we fish for, especially the bigger species like Carp, Pike, Catfish, Sturgeon and Zander. I still to this day see fishermen using inadequate gear for the job, and regularly see anglers using nets that are to small for the species they are fishing for. Sometimes being dragged up the bank and then set on to hard ground, without any consideration for the fish what so ever. So I am setting out to cover some of the essentials that you should have before you even think about going fishing. First and foremost I would like to cover Landing Nets, it is your responsibility to ensure you have a landing net that is big enough for the job. At the very least you should be using a 36 inch net, here I have a 42 inch net, that is more than capable of handling bigger carp.a1d1d230-c53e-4ab7-ab7b-0c921ad71a68_zpsIf you are Sturgeon or Catfishing you might want to consider using a 50 inch net.Now I usually try to unhook the fish in the net even before I think of lifting the fish before an Unhooking Mat. If I can not unhook the fish I will careful run my hand under the fish to make sure all of the fins are facing towards the back of the fish. If the fins are left sticking out from the fish you are running the risk of getting them caught in the net and possibly breaking the fins. Take hold of the net at the spreader block with one hand and the front of the net with the other and gently lift the fish up and out of the water. Making sure the fins are all facing toward the back of the fish, and gently lower down on to your unhooking mat.That leads me nicely on to unhooking mats, there is no excuse these days, you can buy unhooking mats in various sizes nowadays for very little money. It is not acceptable to be just using a towel, especially with the bigger species. Always make sure that your mat is wet, you don't want to be putting a large fish down on to a dry mat, this can take away some of the fishes protective mucus. c5b9fff5-2a3b-411e-8ff1-c7c90aa84cf8_zpsYou should always have a bucket to hand full of lake water, to pour over the fish while it is laying on the mat. This is the one I use, its really a expander bait bucket, but it holds a lot of water and is easy to fold up and pack away into my rod quiver. You must keep this fish wet at all times. If this fish starts to flap around while on the mat, you can just simply cover its head with either part of the unhooking mat or just place your hand gently over the eye, until the fish calms down. The next items I would like to run through are the unhooking tools. These are the two tools I use for removing hooks.87e1af8f-8383-4bc0-95f6-10ae0a818ee7_zpsI use these tools as they give me better purchase when unhooking fish. The long nose pliers are for unhooking the fish and the cutters are for cutting through the hooks. So much damage is done to fishes mouths through anglers, and all you have to do is just use a bit of common sense, if the hook has gone all the way through the mouth of the fish then just cut the hook in half. Remember your priority is to fishes welfare, hooks are a few pence each.d15c8ab9-b025-4d8d-aeaa-100bbc849f22_zpsThe bottle in the picture is fish antiseptic, this should be used if the fish has either spawning damage to scales, any cuts or grazes and should be used on the wound the hook has caused. In all honesty hook holes usually heal themselves, but I certainly doesn't hurt to put some on just in case. If I saw a scale missing or any cuts and grazes to a fish I would squeeze some of the antiseptic on to the area and gently rub into the wound. As for mouth damage I just find it easier to use these cotton buds. Just squeeze a little antiseptic on to the cotton bud and treat the area, inside and out if necessary. If you are not weighing the fish then, again, make sure all of the fins are facing towards the tail end of the fish and return to the water in your landing net. Do not pick up the fish to return as the fish may flap around causing you to drop the fish on to the ground. Whilst the fish is in the water take hold of the tail and gently hold the fish in the upright position until the fish either kicks or feels strong enough to release. Do not just put the fish back into the water and hope for the best. None of these tools have to be expensive, but we all have a duty to care for the fish we catch for future generations to come. That's it for now, that is the essential kit guide for the newcomer to the sport, if you are a little unsure of what you are doing try to go with someone who is more experienced and let them show you how to look after our fish. It is also worth a mention that if dipping tanks are supplied, it is your responsibility to use these tanks and dip all of your carp care gear.When you get all of your gear home you should wash it all down with clean water and leave out in the sun to dry as the UV rays will kill most of the parasites, associated with harming fish.These days the carp care gear isn't expensive and is often over looked by a lot of anglers. Before you rush out to buy your first rod and reel you must take into consideration the fish you are angling for, and purchase some of these items to protect the fish for future generations.Next time i will move on to weighing and handling fish, until then, be lucky

91537760-0c78-406b-b9ab-4e92a35c171d_zpsCarp care is one of those aspects of carp fishing that should be taken seriously as we all have a responsibility to look after the quarry we fish for, especially the bigger species like Carp, Pike, Catfish, Sturgeon and Zander. I still to this day see fishermen using inadequate gear for the job, and regularly see anglers using nets that are to small for the species they are fishing for. Sometimes being dragged up the bank and then set on to hard ground, without any consideration for the fish what so ever. So I am setting out to cover some of the essentials that you should have before you even think about going fishing. First and foremost I would like to cover Landing Nets, it is your responsibility to ensure you have a landing net that is big enough for the job. At the very least you should be using a 36 inch net, here I have a 42 inch net, that is more than capable of handling bigger carp.a1d1d230-c53e-4ab7-ab7b-0c921ad71a68_zpsIf you are Sturgeon or Catfishing you might want to consider using a 50 inch net.Now I usually try to unhook the fish in the net even before I think of lifting the fish before an Unhooking Mat. If I can not unhook the fish I will careful run my hand under the fish to make sure all of the fins are facing towards the back of the fish. If the fins are left sticking out from the fish you are running the risk of getting them caught in the net and possibly breaking the fins. Take hold of the net at the spreader block with one hand and the front of the net with the other and gently lift the fish up and out of the water. Making sure the fins are all facing toward the back of the fish, and gently lower down on to your unhooking mat.That leads me nicely on to unhooking mats, there is no excuse these days, you can buy unhooking mats in various sizes nowadays for very little money. It is not acceptable to be just using a towel, especially with the bigger species. Always make sure that your mat is wet, you don't want to be putting a large fish down on to a dry mat, this can take away some of the fishes protective mucus. c5b9fff5-2a3b-411e-8ff1-c7c90aa84cf8_zpsYou should always have a bucket to hand full of lake water, to pour over the fish while it is laying on the mat. This is the one I use, its really a expander bait bucket, but it holds a lot of water and is easy to fold up and pack away into my rod quiver. You must keep this fish wet at all times. If this fish starts to flap around while on the mat, you can just simply cover its head with either part of the unhooking mat or just place your hand gently over the eye, until the fish calms down. The next items I would like to run through are the unhooking tools. These are the two tools I use for removing hooks.87e1af8f-8383-4bc0-95f6-10ae0a818ee7_zpsI use these tools as they give me better purchase when unhooking fish. The long nose pliers are for unhooking the fish and the cutters are for cutting through the hooks. So much damage is done to fishes mouths through anglers, and all you have to do is just use a bit of common sense, if the hook has gone all the way through the mouth of the fish then just cut the hook in half. Remember your priority is to fishes welfare, hooks are a few pence each.d15c8ab9-b025-4d8d-aeaa-100bbc849f22_zpsThe bottle in the picture is fish antiseptic, this should be used if the fish has either spawning damage to scales, any cuts or grazes and should be used on the wound the hook has caused. In all honesty hook holes usually heal themselves, but I certainly doesn't hurt to put some on just in case. If I saw a scale missing or any cuts and grazes to a fish I would squeeze some of the antiseptic on to the area and gently rub into the wound. As for mouth damage I just find it easier to use these cotton buds. Just squeeze a little antiseptic on to the cotton bud and treat the area, inside and out if necessary. If you are not weighing the fish then, again, make sure all of the fins are facing towards the tail end of the fish and return to the water in your landing net. Do not pick up the fish to return as the fish may flap around causing you to drop the fish on to the ground. Whilst the fish is in the water take hold of the tail and gently hold the fish in the upright position until the fish either kicks or feels strong enough to release. Do not just put the fish back into the water and hope for the best. None of these tools have to be expensive, but we all have a duty to care for the fish we catch for future generations to come. That's it for now, that is the essential kit guide for the newcomer to the sport, if you are a little unsure of what you are doing try to go with someone who is more experienced and let them show you how to look after our fish. It is also worth a mention that if dipping tanks are supplied, it is your responsibility to use these tanks and dip all of your carp care gear.When you get all of your gear home you should wash it all down with clean water and leave out in the sun to dry as the UV rays will kill most of the parasites, associated with harming fish.These days the carp care gear isn't expensive and is often over looked by a lot of anglers. Before you rush out to buy your first rod and reel you must take into consideration the fish you are angling for, and purchase some of these items to protect the fish for future generations.Next time i will move on to weighing and handling fish, until then, be lucky

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  • 10 months later...

Beanz u can't really see it in these pics it's was slippy as hell that's why I'm not holding the fish normally that's were the fish was that day no-one normally fish's that end.. I won't be fishing that end again lesson learnt. It was a nightmare if u get what I mean the weather did not help.. Even tho the pictures don't show it

 

trust me, iv fished some right nasty swims, the fact that I can see grass, means I class yours as tidy. now from the pics you've managed to get up the "slippery bank/steps" and on too flat ground but not managed to bend your knees on flat grass lol standing still on wet grass there isn't really any chance of your feet slipping> is there??? so the fact you have got the fish up the very slippery bank( in the net or sling ,or just carried??) means I don't believe there is any reason for standing up with the fish for a pic..................unless like I said.....you skipped fish care lessons!!! :wink:

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Let's put it this way, carrying a fish up or down steps, up and around a swim is a no no.

 

The only place it should be carried from is from the water to your unhooking mat in the net, then from your unhooking mat back to the water in the sling or cradle itself.

 

'Choose a good place for photographs', Piffle, choose a safe place for photographs, and that means close to the waters edge, not miles away from the swim. I see too many dvd's of videos, with some big name anglers, who should know better, taking fish 10metres or more away from the lake, just so they can get the 'perfect picture'.

 

Sure, perfect world you don't want rods or bivvy in the background, but I know that that is not always possible. Some swims are quite tight, so there is going to be rods in the background. You would much rather not having a tree grow out of your head, but sometimes space just doesn't allow this.

 

The next big No No is standing up for pictures. Yes, years ago it happened, but now we know better, keep the fish low to the ground. Yes we now use unhooking mats, sure years ago we didn't and there may be some old pics around with no visible mat.

 

 

Time out of the water should be kept to an absolute minimum. Unhooking, weighing and photographs take me, on a self timer 3 minutes tops. With someone else about, the same. I usually have no need to get the perfect picture, although occasionally.

 

Retaining fish, in the sack or sling, minimum time. The time it takes to get your camera sorted. To be honest, I don't like needing a retaining sling or sack unless absolutely necessary.

I rest the fish in the margins still in landing net while I make sure everything is in place, scales zeroed, camera in place and on stand.

As I unhook the fish, I have the scales already zeroed, I have the sling on the unhooking mat already. Unhook, slide net out, fish into sling and weigh. I already have camera in place set on spot aimed at mat. Self timer, pics checked, job done. The sling is still in the mat, fish back into sling and returned to water. Job done.

 

You don't need to photograph every fish, many I return unphotographed, I don't need to add extra stress and time just to fuel my ego with another 20lb common, or a single of found figure fish. Yet many of my best fish are properly photographed, of whatever species in minutes.

 

Simples!

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""" Sure, perfect world you don't want rods or bivvy in the background, but I know that that is not always possible. Some swims are quite tight, so there is going to be rods in the background. You would much rather not having a tree grow out of your head, but sometimes space just doesn't allow this."""""

 

How different we all are , I personally like (if I can) to capture the whole event with my photos , rods, bivvy the lake in the background and me holding the fish looking at the camera, with date and time.

 

I see plenty of good photos against a green bush ,but to me they are meaningless .

 

I know this is an old photo , I don't take many but will try to change that now I have a new camera.

Kingfisher%2028%2010.jpg

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""" Sure, perfect world you don't want rods or bivvy in the background, but I know that that is not always possible. Some swims are quite tight, so there is going to be rods in the background. You would much rather not having a tree grow out of your head, but sometimes space just doesn't allow this."""""How different we all are , I personally like (if I can) to capture the whole event with my photos , rods, bivvy the lake in the background and me holding the fish looking at the camera, with date and time. I see plenty of good photos against a green bush ,but to me they are meaningless . I know this is an old photo , I don't take many but will try to change that now I have a new camera.Kingfisher%2028%2010.jpg

I do like that pic :wink:

 

Try this one:

26lbNazeing30-1-2-13_zps354e7854.jpg

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each to there own,I like a none swim background normally,with a big smile on my face

same as stevo. each to their own as you say. but in this day and age with all the literature in mags, internet etc there is no excuse for poor fish care. standing with a fish like the fella has done is just not on, well unless your at sea with a fat cod ready for the pot lol. just hope that now its been high lighted to him he won't do it again.

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