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Well, the idea behind shrink tubing - or at least the original "line aligner" concept that used silicon tubing was to elongate the hook shank and accentuate the bend to give a "bent hook" effect without the actual long and bent shank (bent hooks rigs can give excellent hook-ups but can lead to horrendous mouth damage so are, quite rightly, now banned). The long-shank nailer type hooks are just as dangerous and indeed are also banned on many waters.

If the hook pattern already has a curved (but short) shank then I would perhaps agree that a device that creates a more "aggressive" angle to help the hook to turn and catch hold may not be required.

I used to fish a very snaggy water and was using Nash Fang X hooks at the time (a very strong, short, curved shank pattern) but I still added a small length of tubing as a line aligner. I found that this did indeed help convert more pick-ups into hooked fish especially when using very supple braids as hook links.

In short, if you are used to using tubing on other hook patterns then I see no reason to stop with a curved shank pattern. Even if it is not essential it certainly wouldn't hurt.

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My personal preference with curvshank hooks is to tie it is a very very aggressive 'Kd' style, so that if you pull the hooklink and hair, the hook almost sits at 90degrees to the hook link. With a relitevely long hair, and short hooklink. It looks utterly wrong, feels wrong, and even after most of my best fish to that rig, I still look at it as if I was on crack when I first tied it.

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Well, the idea behind shrink tubing - or at least the original "line aligner" concept that used silicon tubing was to elongate the hook shank and accentuate the bend to give a "bent hook" effect without the actual long and bent shank (bent hooks rigs can give excellent hook-ups but can lead to horrendous mouth damage so are, quite rightly, now banned). The long-shank nailer type hooks are just as dangerous and indeed are also banned on many waters.

If the hook pattern already has a curved (but short) shank then I would perhaps agree that a device that creates a more "aggressive" angle to help the hook to turn and catch hold may not be required.

I used to fish a very snaggy water and was using Nash Fang X hooks at the time (a very strong, short, curved shank pattern) but I still added a small length of tubing as a line aligner. I found that this did indeed help convert more pick-ups into hooked fish especially when using very supple braids as hook links.

In short, if you are used to using tubing on other hook patterns then I see no reason to stop with a curved shank pattern. Even if it is not essential it certainly wouldn't hurt.

 

ok a little confused? is using shrink tubing to create more of a bend in an already bent hook ok or is it dangerous? also i cant use braid as it is banned

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Hi esmin I personally have had better results using a large widegape hook with mono hooklinks

I'm not saying curvshanks won't work but all the bigger fish I have had with mono have been on widegapes and no shrinktube when I have experimented between the two hook patterns, I think it has something to do with the way the eye of the hook is angled when you tie it knotlessknot style using mono it kicks the mono out this points the point of the hook down when you use a curvshank it almost over compensates and because you don't have the suppleness of the braid the hook wont flip round properly tie some up and have a look for yourself.

 

In response to your question I don't think adding shrinktube will be dangerous but it might cost you a bite.

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Well, the idea behind shrink tubing - or at least the original "line aligner" concept that used silicon tubing was to elongate the hook shank and accentuate the bend to give a "bent hook" effect without the actual long and bent shank (bent hooks rigs can give excellent hook-ups but can lead to horrendous mouth damage so are, quite rightly, now banned). The long-shank nailer type hooks are just as dangerous and indeed are also banned on many waters.

If the hook pattern already has a curved (but short) shank then I would perhaps agree that a device that creates a more "aggressive" angle to help the hook to turn and catch hold may not be required.

I used to fish a very snaggy water and was using Nash Fang X hooks at the time (a very strong, short, curved shank pattern) but I still added a small length of tubing as a line aligner. I found that this did indeed help convert more pick-ups into hooked fish especially when using very supple braids as hook links.

In short, if you are used to using tubing on other hook patterns then I see no reason to stop with a curved shank pattern. Even if it is not essential it certainly wouldn't hurt.

 

ok a little confused? is using shrink tubing to create more of a bend in an already bent hook ok or is it dangerous? also i cant use braid as it is banned

Some shrink tube set-ups can mimick the bent hook but are not dangerous as the tubing is flexible.

I use tubing on most of my rigs as a line aligner. Hope this clears it up...

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You can use mono/fluoro with a curve shank but to stop it from closing up the gape of the hook you need to store it on a rig board under tension then it will be fine

I agree about the mono... There is little need for a more aggressive curve as the inherent stiffness in the mono causes the hook to "kick out" at an angle anyway - if you know what I mean? It depends on the rig...

 

Today, I tied up a few rigs. They consisted of:

 

2 mono rigs, 8", (10lb Pro gold & 15lb Amnesia), no shrink tubing, tied knot-less style but with very supple 6lb braided hairs whipped on underneath.

 

3 Snakebite combi links, 25lb, 6" with shrink tubing bent slightly, last inch stripped off and stiff for the rest,

 

1 hinged stiff rig (Terry Hearn type), 20lb ESP Bristle filament, D rigged hook.

 

1 supple link (Merlin), 25lb, 5", shrink tubing bent slightly.

 

Each one different but effective if used in the right situations.

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just wondering about curve shank hooks by korda it says on the packet that there is no need for shrink tubing because the way in which the hook is made. would it be beneficial to add some shrink tubing anyway?

 

The stipulation I have on bottom bait or snowman rigs is that the hook is line aligned, as I have noticed that shorter shank hooks (even curved shanks), I don't always get a good hookhold with no extension.

 

The hair length is also then carefully watched to match the right length for getting the hook to penetrate into the middle of the bottom lip.

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