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boilies or dead maggots in winter


glyngriffiths
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Welcome to Carp.com.

 

I have moved your other thread about the water you wanted some information on into the UK Where to fish section :wink:

 

As for your question about maggots or boilies, this may help (or confuse):

http://www.carp.com/carp-forum/viewtopic.php?t=57786

 

It is a thread called 'Flummoxed', and has various viewpoints on it :wink::D

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  • 1 month later...

Fortunatley its now spring time!!!

 

I am a real boilie user, no matter what time of year. i firmly believe that carp will continue to feed throughout the year once you establish a high quality HNV bait. I will start prebaiting with a HNV bait that i intend to use over the year, feeding it in spots where i can see the carp feeding, once ive got evidence that they are feeding on it, I.E. i actually see them troughing it down or areas ive previously baited are getting cleared up and cleaned off, then i will start to up the feed over the months whilst fishing and when on prebait missions. by the time winter comes around, the carp are used to feeding on my HNV bait that it is recognised as a food source. if you continue to feed during the winter, the carp will recognise a constant food source and continue to feed in the cold as carp will continue to feed if the energy gained from their foodsource exceeds the energy exerted to find it. if the carp cannot get enough energy from their foodsource, whatever it is, they will have no choice but to slow down to conserve what little energy they have left. if they can aquire lots of energy from their food, they continue to move about, happily burning energy, which they then happily feed on your HNV bait - giving you a chance of catching it! So long as the bait keeps going in, they should keep eating it all winter giving you endless chances for success.

 

A few seasons back i did the method described above, using "premier aminos 2000/GLM with a salmon oil, betaine, sugar, and a blue cheese flavour with a few other additives which i forget now it was a mike willmot appitite stimulator i think, anyway, i fed it in all year, and come winter, on xmas eve, i had a brace of 20s. the 1st fish was still in the net when the 2nd rod rattled off! This lake was rock hard, 5 fish a season was doing really well, i had over 20 fish that season all feeding well on my chosen HNV bait any time of year.

 

Incedentally, i had been using the same premier aminos/GLM base with salmon oil and just changing the flavour each season, maple the year before blue cheese, mixed herbs before that, all worked extremely well, i could even chop and change with no impact on results. makes you think, i put the flavour in yet it made no effect on results, it was the base the carp were looking for and feeding on, the flavour was errelevant!

 

My new "hard-speccie" lake has been subject to a baiting campaign with mainline Cell for the last 4 months, although admittedly the lake has been closed for the last 3 months due to otters/flooding (anyone see my regiment helping out with the floods eh???) the pressure was off for the fish as no one could angle for them, so just bait going in. went yesterday, there at 9am, 22lb ghostie common on Cell pop up over a mahoosive Pva bag of midi pellet - no Cell free bait this time, i wanted the only Cell boilie the carp found to be my hookbait!

 

I have found that time and time again, if you choose a high quality HNV bait and apply it to your chosen water over the year, you will reap the benefits, rolling your own keeps the cost down, better than readymades, with next to no nutritional value, and cheaper then frozen readymades, which although are nutritionally superior, can be cost prohibitive. i have often found it cheaper to make my own, then it is also unique, as you add your own goodies.

 

i find that this baiting campaign works really well, by carrying on throughout the colder months, adapting the feed levels to the weather conditions, you can continue to catch in the winter.

 

Indeed, how many more carp would some anglers catch if they continued their heavy feeding tactics of the summer into colder weather. rather than switching to "fashionable" single hi viz pop ups as soon as it gets cold, when the carp still wanna big load of grub?!? Maybe we have conditioned some carp to shut down in winter as we all suddenly cut off their winter food supply, meaning they can no longer replenish lost energy as their high energy foodsource has been cut, so they slow down and shut down. Lakes are a large body of water which have been progressively adsorbing heat all summer, they dont get freezing cold straight away but will cool down gradually. obviously the amounts you feed need to be adjusted in relation to the weather, but i think we actually miss out by stopping the feed as it gets cold.

 

:)

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Fortunatley its now spring time!!!

I am a real boilie user, no matter what time of year. i firmly believe that carp will continue to feed throughout the year once you establish a high quality HNV bait. I will start prebaiting with a HNV bait that i intend to use over the year, feeding it in spots where i can see the carp feeding, once ive got evidence that they are feeding on it, I.E. i actually see them troughing it down or areas ive previously baited are getting cleared up and cleaned off, then i will start to up the feed over the months whilst fishing and when on prebait missions. by the time winter comes around, the carp are used to feeding on my HNV bait that it is recognised as a food source. if you continue to feed during the winter, the carp will recognise a constant food source and continue to feed in the cold as carp will continue to feed if the energy gained from their foodsource exceeds the energy exerted to find it. if the carp cannot get enough energy from their foodsource, whatever it is, they will have no choice but to slow down to conserve what little energy they have left. if they can aquire lots of energy from their food, they continue to move about, happily burning energy, which they then happily feed on your HNV bait - giving you a chance of catching it! So long as the bait keeps going in, they should keep eating it all winter giving you endless chances for success.

A few seasons back i did the method described above, using "premier aminos 2000/GLM with a salmon oil, betaine, sugar, and a blue cheese flavour with a few other additives which i forget now it was a mike willmot appitite stimulator i think, anyway, i fed it in all year, and come winter, on xmas eve, i had a brace of 20s. the 1st fish was still in the net when the 2nd rod rattled off! This lake was rock hard, 5 fish a season was doing really well, i had over 20 fish that season all feeding well on my chosen HNV bait any time of year.

Incedentally, i had been using the same premier aminos/GLM base with salmon oil and just changing the flavour each season, maple the year before blue cheese, mixed herbs before that, all worked extremely well, i could even chop and change with no impact on results. makes you think, i put the flavour in yet it made no effect on results, it was the base the carp were looking for and feeding on, the flavour was errelevant!

My new "hard-speccie" lake has been subject to a baiting campaign with mainline Cell for the last 4 months, although admittedly the lake has been closed for the last 3 months due to otters/flooding (anyone see my regiment helping out with the floods eh???) the pressure was off for the fish as no one could angle for them, so just bait going in. went yesterday, there at 9am, 22lb ghostie common on Cell pop up over a mahoosive Pva bag of midi pellet - no Cell free bait this time, i wanted the only Cell boilie the carp found to be my hookbait!

I have found that time and time again, if you choose a high quality HNV bait and apply it to your chosen water over the year, you will reap the benefits, rolling your own keeps the cost down, better than readymades, with next to no nutritional value, and cheaper then frozen readymades, which although are nutritionally superior, can be cost prohibitive. i have often found it cheaper to make my own, then it is also unique, as you add your own goodies.

i find that this baiting campaign works really well, by carrying on throughout the colder months, adapting the feed levels to the weather conditions, you can continue to catch in the winter.

Indeed, how many more carp would some anglers catch if they continued their heavy feeding tactics of the summer into colder weather. rather than switching to "fashionable" single hi viz pop ups as soon as it gets cold, when the carp still wanna big load of grub?!? Maybe we have conditioned some carp to shut down in winter as we all suddenly cut off their winter food supply, meaning they can no longer replenish lost energy as their high energy foodsource has been cut, so they slow down and shut down. Lakes are a large body of water which have been progressively adsorbing heat all summer, they dont get freezing cold straight away but will cool down gradually. obviously the amounts you feed need to be adjusted in relation to the weather, but i think we actually miss out by stopping the feed as it gets cold.

:)

I know the subject has come up on here time and time again , and nobody can really prove it one way or another , but just for a little bit of fun ;

 

I cant wait till Nick sees that you class the "C" word as a HNV boilie lol

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In my defence the C#ll is not my usual choice, i far prefer an actual home made HNV Base such as the bases i get from premier, i'm using the cell as i'm part of a small baiting team on our "speccie" lake, and the cell home made/frozen readies had already been chosen i would have gone for a premier mix.

 

however... second session on speccie lake, 3hr session as had the 5yr old and 6yr old, dropped a single cell pop up over one of "my spots" with a pouchful of pellet, had a 21.5lb common carp! Two 20s in 2 very quick sessions, none of this long session fishing for this callsign!

 

I was set up on another swim, my 6yr old suddenly stood up, announced that there were no carp in my swim and promptly marched around to the exact oppasite side of the lake and told me the carp were all here, so i moved and caught the 21lber...

 

:)=-O:-P

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All hi-tec stuff then lol . Listen mate i aint knocking the "c" word cos it works , we all know it too .

It certainley cant be bad for the fish , after all they eat enuff of it.

 

I reckon so much of the stuff goes into many many lakes all the time making baiting "teams" futile .

 

Mind you everywheres different .

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I agree with you buddy, baiting teams can be futile on very busy waters, i am currently fishing is not baited at all, not even fished by any regulars, everyone i spoke to warnedcme against putting any bait in as the carp all spook off and nothing is caught. only discrete particle traps in the edge will score, so to be different, we decided to fill it in, and ive now had 2 20s in 2 short sessions while the others blanked.

 

:)

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Lol!! I know the feeling, if i cant get anything out of the anglers on the lake whilst walking about without any tackle, i find that they will give a little more info if you keep it low key and talk without tackle visible - if they know your not fishing then your less of a "threat" than stood there with all your gear asking for a lead. Otherwise i scope the local tackleshops and ask what boilie is most popular and selling well - its usually because is worked before and all the lads jump on the bandwagon. The baillif should give you an idea, its his livelyhood after all. Also i like to use "old" "simple" and "blown" basic flavours such as strawberry, peach, banana, maple etc as i find that lots of anglers head for and pick the more obscure and "complicated" the flavour is or sounds, the more likely the angler will be drawn to it as its "different" whereas they ignore good old strawberry as its "blown" and everybody uses it... Ask yourself, when did you last buy strawberry boilies? How many people ignore strawberry in favour of a more in fashion or "vogue" bait? The new generation of carp may have never been caught on a strawberry boilie?!? Good old strawberry jam from richworth was a cracking bait in its day, smells gorgeous and was a deep red, well nice! The readymades were a little bitter to chew! Too many anglers overlook the old "simple" flavours thinking them over-used, but if everyone ignores them then then they are never-used the "old" baits could be due a revival we'll never know if we keep overlooking them...

 

:rolleyes:

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banurane.jpg 35lb common PB. Caught on a strawberry/plum pop up.

 

Just flicked through"a carp strikes back" by R. Hutchinson, exellent book - mentions the same "old" bait theory as ive just mentioned, its really worth thinking it all over, banana could take your water apart, but would anyone think to use it, or the in vogue bait from mainline or another top bait company?

 

:rolleyes:

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He cant relive the experience...

 

I truly believe the "forgotten flavours" will still score but they dont get used as no one buys them. I once had a really good milk/seed/nut base mix with a hemp oil that did me really well, i used it for several seasons, after an extensive prebaiting campaign to get the carp looking to it as a food source, i was totally confident with it, but would change the flavour to the same base each season to shake it up a bit. One year, mixed herbs, then maple, then peach and then strawberry. (tried strawberry after everyone told me it was pants and had blown so everyone stopped using it) i never noticed a reduction in catches, the carp were so used to the base as a food source that they would recognise the base and trough it down despite what flavour it was allied with, almost as if they were so hooked on the base the flavour (which was always at a low dosage anyway, i find over flavoured long term HNV baits - (hi attract if you will) to not be as effective long term as subtly flavoured bases) that the actual flavour was irrelevant.

 

Yes, i even did well on the strawberry; on a lake where it had "blown" and was "rubbish"

 

:rolleyes:

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I'm not sure i want to know the incident that put you off Bannanas :lol:

 

I think the worse a fish meal tastes, the better it is!

Never liked them, the smell is enough to put me off, and actually make me gag, since I was a kid. I tried to eat them, see if I could persuade myself that I could like them, but never worked.

 

Fishmeals keep on catching, and I honestly don't think that there is a nice tasting to me fishmeal, yet they work well with some weird flavours at low level.

 

Ouch's flavour level comments are spot on, low level flavours are the best course of action. Going high and the carp can really ignore a bait, or it catches instantly and then all catches cease

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Each has its day. No right or wrong answer!

 

I would say on the point of using 'naturals' lots of fish these days have been raised on boilies, and never seen a maggot in their life. Which is the real natural bait?

 

Tis a good point indeed Mr. Milky.

 

PVA with deaduns + boilie crumb etc will work wonders.

 

Although, if there are silverfish, and you are willing to actually fish for your carp.....a spray of maggots and casters every 2 mins will get them going, even in winter.

 

Be active.

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