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jameschelt85

Line tension on gravel pits

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Tbh im a little bit confused by the question and the significance of the term gravel pit .

When you ask about line tension on gravel pits are you asking specifically about gravel pits ( in which case i cant help having never fished one) or you asking generally about large , possibly windswept lakes , and having to fish at long range ?

Anyway imo choddies have to be fished with slack lines , zigs with tight lines .

Both for reasons of indication.

In fact whilst fishing at long range it would be advisable to fish very tight lines otherwise a carp could take your rig halfway round the lake before you know anything about it . :)

As for fishing pva bags or bottom baits i think you pays your money & takes your choice really , depending on what range your fishing at.

 

Personally i tend to fish slack lines with running rigs for nearly all my fishing , finding indication miles better , unless i was fishing at long range .

 

As for the weed , have you tried sticking your rod tips up in the air somewhat to try and avoid it ?

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I say gravel pits specifically because the bottom is rarely uniform and i was just thinking if i fish a tight line theirs a chance of damage from gravel bars and the line wont be travelling in a straight line if u no what i mean.

 

 

And i have tried putting the rods up high but the lines still pick up weed further out.

 

Sorry if the question is a bit vauge.

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I don't specify gravel pit, estate lake or reservoir or anything simply as I use a standard running lead set-up almost everywhere on most waters.

 

I would suppose, that the Lee valley Relief lakes/lagoons strictly speaking are gravel pits; dug I guess for the motorways around the area from the edge of London up to Luton, but again, I use that same running lead set-up with slack lines.

 

If you have a tight line over gravel, and movement (from a taking fish), can cause it to rub over the gravel, abrading it. Compare that to a slack line on the take, and the line is not tight at the start, but you do get indication as it pulls up. Obviously the line becomes tight once you strike into the fish. :wink::!:

 

For zig rig fishing, you would need to use a tight line to my mind as you may be having to react to a fish that takes and can eject the bait mid-water, and will need to strike the little bleeps/movement.

 

As for chod rig, I again would be fishing a tight line, despite latest fashion saying fish it slack. It is a semi-fixed set-up, and again, to my mind the fish can move the lead if it fished slack. If that take comes towards you with a slack line, you may get no indication as you can't get a drop-back with the indicator already at its dropped/lowest setting. Only if the fish moves away from you will you get indication as the line is pulled tight.

 

As I say, I prefer to use running leads, and have been able to get away with it from short ranges (margins), up to around 100metres with no problems. The line goes slack, and falls against the lakebed, and over the gravel bars (if any) between you and the end tackle. Also the slack line may not alert the fish, and thrum in wind or water movement.

 

There is a but though, in waters where there is undertow, or strong winds causing plenty of water movement then you may not be able to get the line totally slack, so you may need to resort to tight lines. On the running lead with a tight line, you then create a very nice bolt rig effect, and with the indicators at the top, tight line, you will get indication of a drop back or taking line.

 

I don't know if this is any use:

 

http://www.carp.com/carp-forum/viewtopic.php?t=27479

http://www.carp.com/carp-forum/viewtopic.php?t=26640

 

While they are older threads from Hot Topics, up to date views and fishing are always welcomed, so I have attached the links. If needed I can always copy and paste and bring one back into modern main forum :wink:

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I wouldn't fish a chod on a tight line, it kind of defeats the object. Tighter lines are easier cut than slack. Gravel pits are notorious for sharp objects, stones, flint and so on, especially gravel bars and humps.

If your worried about sharp objects use a leader.

Thats also dependant on weed and snags.

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Any tips for drifting weed, maybe a backlead ?? Because it really is annoying and the tension the weed puts on the line must move the rig ?? Has anyone had a take and landed a fish when their mainline is covered in weed and it all gets clogged in the rod tip because that cant be good.

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I cant see how you can fish a tight line with a chod rig? I just look at a picture in my head of a tight line from the lead to the rod tip. Then I imagine where the rig would be - well off the bottom???

 

Nige,

 

What you may not be able to see is that even with a tight line the line arcs down from the rod tip to the lakebed over what is actually quite a short distance; I reckon at 40metres onwards, the line will be laying on the lakebed.

 

Imagine the telegraph poles and cables, the line arcs from pole to pole, there is a droop in the cable, the same sort of thing happens with fishing line from the rod tip, only there is no next pole to lift it back up.

 

As for the chod on the tight line, once the line is tight, it does not move or slide up with a free-running chod, or with a semi-fixed chod, it won't slide up over the top bead.

 

Drifting weed is a 'mare, and strangely enough a very slack line running over the lakebed will help. Get your rod tips under the water, or the rod tips very low, and the line dropping straight from the rod tips. With the slack line the line does not seem to catch so much drifting rubbish.

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In fact whilst fishing at long range it would be advisable to fish very tight lines otherwise a carp could take your rig halfway round the lake before you know anything about it . :)

I have to disagree. A fish can kite very very easily with mega tight line, it could take you a full 180 degrees bank to bank without so much of a beep.

 

However, the worst possible thing to do IMO is to fish a slack line with mono, or a light braid. Even of its supposedly sinks. The line cuts through the water when pulled, and has to completely straighten before you get any indication.

With a fluro, or heavy braid, the weight of the line, and resistance of the water makes the pasth of least resistance linear, and so no matter how slack the line is, if the line is pulled an inch at the end, you will register an inch at your rods. This is collaboration with running rigs or naked chods.

My opinion with naked chods is that as long as the bottom bead is a few feet up the line, when the hook is lifted, the lead will stay still still, and line will be be pulled from the rod end, giving possative feedback at the buzzer. Bites usually consist of several beeps and a lifted bobbin.

 

To answer OP's question, I would be happy, no snags involved, to fish mega slack lines with running rigs or chose at any distance on any lake. I fish a windswept reservoir or two and it doesn' effect me. The only issue is casting fluro or heavy braid the required distances!

Semi fixed leads will always give poor indication imo unless the fish runs directly away from you.

If I was going to fish tight lines, I would want to fish the tips right in the air, with the line so tight its in the verge of lifting the lead off the bottom, now that's a style you don't see anymore!

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I have to disagree. A fish can kite very very easily with mega tight line, it could take you a full 180 degrees bank to bank without so much of a beep.

 

However, the worst possible thing to do IMO is to fish a slack line with mono, or a light braid. Even of its supposedly sinks. The line cuts through the water when pulled, and has to completely straighten before you get any indication.

With a fluro, or heavy braid, the weight of the line, and resistance of the water makes the pasth of least resistance linear, and so no matter how slack the line is, if the line is pulled an inch at the end, you will register an inch at your rods. This is collaboration with running rigs or naked chods.

My opinion with naked chods is that as long as the bottom bead is a few feet up the line, when the hook is lifted, the lead will stay still still, and line will be be pulled from the rod end, giving possative feedback at the buzzer. Bites usually consist of several beeps and a lifted bobbin.

 

To answer OP's question, I would be happy, no snags involved, to fish mega slack lines with running rigs or chose at any distance on any lake. I fish a windswept reservoir or two and it doesn' effect me. The only issue is casting fluro or heavy braid the required distances!

Semi fixed leads will always give poor indication imo unless the fish runs directly away from you.

If I was going to fish tight lines, I would want to fish the tips right in the air, with the line so tight its in the verge of lifting the lead off the bottom, now that's a style you don't see anymore!

Not so sure about mono not working with a slack line, as I used Daiwa Sensor for years, and now Gardner Pro-Carp 9for the last 2 or 3), and I fished a running lead and slack line with no problems, although that may be down to making sure I got the line down to the lakebed.

 

Cast out, tighten up to lead, then put rod tip under water, and pull line off the reel (baitrunner or clutch) until it is slack. Allow some extra line off the reel as you put rod onto buzzer. Over time the indicator will likely lift, each time it does, allow more slack off the reel until it stays down at maximum drop, lowest point. I think that the line is 'pulled through a tube' with a running lead and slack line, so you always get indication, and as the line pulls tight to the indicator, it can go no further, indicator rises, buzzer bleeps (and line clips cracks) striking for you. 

 

As for fish kiting on a tight line, I have seen it happen. A mate cast to the corner of an island, and with no bleep, and no movement on indicator the fish kited in a perfect arc. It was only watching the line cutting through the water that gave away he had a fish on.

 

I can also remember various articles in magazines (often about Wraysbury), where anglers have gone out to check rigs in a boat, and discovered them moved well away from where they had been put in; complete with lead drag marks across the lakebed.

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Not so sure about mono not working with a slack line, as I used Daiwa Sensor for years, and now Gardner Pro-Carp 9for the last 2 or 3), and I fished a running lead and slack line with no problems, although that may be down to making sure I got the line down to the lakebed.

 

Cast out, tighten up to lead, then put rod tip under water, and pull line off the reel (baitrunner or clutch) until it is slack. Allow some extra line off the reel as you put rod onto buzzer. Over time the indicator will likely lift, each time it does, allow more slack off the reel until it stays down at maximum drop, lowest point. I think that the line is 'pulled through a tube' with a running lead and slack line, so you always get indication, and as the line pulls tight to the indicator, it can go no further, indicator rises, buzzer bleeps (and line clips cracks) striking for you. 

 

As for fish kiting on a tight line, I have seen it happen. A mate cast to the corner of an island, and with no bleep, and no movement on indicator the fish kited in a perfect arc. It was only watching the line cutting through the water that gave away he had a fish on.

 

I can also remember various articles in magazines (often about Wraysbury), where anglers have gone out to check rigs in a boat, and discovered them moved well away from where they had been put in; complete with lead drag marks across the lakebed.

 

Without meaning to nit pic, I completely agree with you, but I would class what you describe as semi-slack. I would bet that the line near your rig is under some kind of tention.

'True slacklining' IMO as soon as the lead hits the water, let the line go slack, and sink it slowly under very very minimum tention if there is a chop on the water. I've found this way, in the mornings, my line is just how I left it. With mono, it always tightened up over night.

There is no denying, that a true fluro will give better bite indication when slack, due to the heavy resistance it has against water. How much more may be neglegable, maybe 6 beeps on your alarm against 5.

Each has its merits,

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