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APE

Hello and a query about overnight fishing

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I've been angling for the last 10 years and tried every style of angling that I've had the opportunity to with the exception of one. Overnight carping. I have most of the kit I would need (bivvy, barrow, cooking gear, etc) but have no camping experience or overnight fishing experience. Does anyone have any useful tips for a rookie wanting to get out and spend more than just a day fishing?

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Hello mate welcome to the forum . Theres a blinding thread or two on here somewhere that'll help you a lot .

Use the search facility for starters . You'll get plenty of help on here but right now i need my beauty sleep :)

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APE, welcome amongst us. May I ask why you've never done overnighters before, since you obviously have the required kit? Happy to help/offer advice but  a broader picture may help me.

 

Ian

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What are your specific concerns? Ive spent my professional life living under the stars in what few items i can carry on my back. Night fishing is nothing to be scared of, just an adjustment of attitude, there are so many aspects to nighting it, it would help to ascertain your area of questioning.

 

:rolleyes:

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I've not tried it yet as even though I have most of the kit I just haven't had the opportunity to get out for a full weekend. Things have changed a bit recently and I now find myself in a position where it's a real possibility. I think my main concern is over safety while fishing and for myself. I would be fishing alone. Thanks.

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Hi APE, the first thing to look for is a secure fishery, especially as you will be on your own.Look for somewhere that has a lock-in set up, with a baliff on call should you need assistance. Where in the country are you?

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Welcome to Carp.com

 

Simple night fishing tip, always keep your kit organised. There is nothing worse than having to switch on a torch to find the most simple item that should be to hand.

 

I'm sure that Ouch can give you some great tips on organising kit as he is a VIP Army Medical Man, and everything has to be located in the right order for use, whether medical equipment, or even clothing and little bits :wink:  :lol:

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Wotcha.

 

Try and find somewhere that you feel safe.  Go with other folk, introduce yourself to others who are fishing, a quick handshake and cuppa and suddenly you are not fishing alone.  Organise your stuff and be tidy.  Keep light levels low, this will help keep your nightvision intact and prevent annoying others.

 

Take your dog (if uve got one lol)  You will hear alot of strange noises at night, listen to them, try to work out what they might be.  There is no need to be scared, these are just nocturnal critters doing there nocturnal thang.

 

Try this.  Set your bivvy up in the garden with your bed etc and sleep out.  If you find this too uncomfortable, then maybe nightfishing is not for you.

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Surviving at night is all about comfort, having everything you need to hand. When i set up for a night, i like to arrive in time so that i can have a leisurely stroll about and choose my swim and get the rods/baiting etc done and dusted. I decide on the nicest, flattest patch to pitch my bivvy/brolly (depends on prevailing weather conditions) and set up my bivvy. Next is my bedchair to go in, making it all level. Top tip, get a camping roll mat to put on the bedchair to stop cold air coming up from below. Once the bed is arranged, i hook a torch/bivvy light to the top of the bivvy/brolly so i can always just reach above my head and switch on giving me light. A head torch is hooked next to the torch which will stay hanging there until i need it. Head torches are ideal as they have different light settings and a red filter which you can use without destroying your night vision. But you can see a remarkable amount without torches. Remember though, the rods in your eyes take about 10-20mins to "warm up" at night, once all light is extinguished. They tire pretty quickly too, so closing your eyes "recharge" them. The "rods" in the eye are angled slightly, so if you look directly at something, it will appear blurred, look at it from an angle, and it will be clearer. Human nightvision is pretty ineffecient, but once tuned in, you can see pretty well. The moment the "rods" are exposed to light, then they are "fried" and you lose your night vision until the "rods" recover in 10mins of darkness.

 

Inside the bivvy, all food/drink/non essential items in their bags at the back of the bivvy out of the way. The water carrier is kept tucked just in the doorway, next to the gas stove and pots/pans in their bag. - although the kettle is essential, a brew will warm you up when its chilly, and you can knock up pot noodles with a kettle too. Tackle box is between the legs of the bedchair with all my baits/pellets/boilies etc next to the tackle box, with another tiny torch looped around the bedchair frame looking down into the tacklebox/baits bag. In waterproofed bags (canoe bags) all my spare clothes, pants, socks, kept in my rucksack. In another canoe bag, all my waterproofs are kept in there. I never put them in the one bag as wet clothes will ruin your nice dry ones (you can use the canoe bag as a pillow) i have an empty canoe bag that i use for dirty clothes. In a rucksack side pocket, i have waterproofed towel, babywipes and toothbrush etc. I also have back up candles, a multitool, battries and a book to pass the lonely dark hours.

 

I walk the route from the bivvy to the rods so if i get a take, i have already cleared the route of logs, trip hazards, low hanging branches etc, so i dont hit/trip/slip/fall over anything when im running for the rods!

 

As for kit, get the best sleeping bag you can afford - i use my issue bag. A woolen/thermal bag-liner makes a massive difference too. Many thin layers are better than few thick layers, it traps layers of air between the layers and warms up. You can strip off a layer or two if required. .when your in a bag, sleep with as few clothes as possible, so the bag works, they are designed to deflect bodyheat. A good woolly hat is important, 2/3rds of body heat is lost through the head. Have a pair of "bivvy slippers" you can wear in your doss bag rather than your dirty shoes, so if you get a run, you can run to it without worrying about footwear, if you are out on a planned excursion, you can put your "outdoors" shoes and keep the bivvy slippers clean.

 

I mark my line with electrical tape/elastic so i can recast in the dark. I choose spots with markers, tall trees etc, so i can cast the right direction and distance at night. I have a cylume (glowstick) taped to the landing net block so i can see where it is. Get a run? Play it as normal, dont try to bully it or rush it, use your headtorch to play it in and net it, using the red filter so your night vision is not ruined and the carp doesnt spook. Have the scales and unhooking mat close by with a small pot of water to wet the mat and fish and sling if needed. My camera is kept in the top flap of my bergen alongside the wallet, car keys and phone where they stay, safely zipped away until i need them. Each bag is labelled with florescent tape and written on with marker pen so i can read them in low light conditions. Lots of warm drinks and food will keep you going. Night fishing is nothing to be scared of, just bite the bullet and go for it. Midsummer nights are best to learn on, the nights are warm and short so better than a deep midwinter night! Fishing with a mate is much better, they can help out and keep you motivated and give you someone to chat to. Another tip, learn the calls and sounds of nocturnal wildlife, the sound of a vixen on heat screaming is quite disconcerting! You will get used to it mate, its all a great adventure. I love night fishing, but lastly, i would check that your water fishes better at night than during the day, if the water does not produce at night at all, then your missing nothing by fishing the days only.

 

:rolleyes:

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Brilliant. Thanks for the advice. I like the idea of testing it out in the garden (should've thought of that one) to condition myself to the noises. The wife will likely have a laugh as well.

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Brilliant. Thanks for the advice. I like the idea of testing it out in the garden (should've thought of that one) to condition myself to the noises. The wife will likely have a laugh as well.

 

APE, let your wife laugh, it'll be you having the fun.

 

As several people on here will attest, I often sleep out in the garden on warm summer nights. No bivvy, just the bedchair, bag and Trakker Peachskin overblanket, set up under our Damson tree.. During the long hot summer we had last year I did 23 consecutive nights up the top of the garden and got to recognise many of the nocturnal calls......... and to be woken by birdsong is a thing of wonder to me.

 

Night fishing is exactly the same as day sessions but you can see less. Unless you're blessed by a clear sky and a full moon which truly is just lovely and a bit special, trust me.

 

Try it, you'll like it. :wink:

 

Ian

 

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Unless I could take a tent that had central heating, mains electricity and running hot water, I wouldn't even get her out the front door. Even glamping would be to harsh. :wink:

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Lol!! Anyway, fishing is supposed to be a chance to get away from her indoors!!!

 

My first night sessions were in some flimsy argos shelter, cheap sleeping bag and a cheap roll mat, no hot food, no real comforts, i suffered!! Now i carry a bivvy, bedchair, thermal bag/kit, roll mat etc and im nice and toasty.

 

Ironically, i am a squaddie, so im used to lying in a soggy hole in nothing but a doss bag and gortex bivvy bag with bergen, belt kit, rifle and medical kit beside me, so if i can get comfortable in a snow filled hole on salisbury plain in january or a fire trench in afghanistan, e3y2y5e5.jpg with all i can pack on my back, u8y9y2ar.jpgthen with a bivvy, bedchair, etc you should have no dramas.

 

Ive landed my last two pbs, 30lb mirror jyhydesu.jpg and 35lb common 2asy8upy.jpg during the night, although my nocturnal photography skills then were rubbish! Lol! I mean a black top at night?? Got that one squared away now though!

 

:rolleyes:

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Make sure that you buy a decent sleeping bag with a "crash zip"....or failing that, take a decent weight duvet that you can just fold over you (open bit towards the bivvy door).

Nothing worse than getting a screaming run in the middle of the night to find you can't get out of your cheap as chips sleeping bag. You'll end up falling off of your bedchair, wriggling across the ground like some giant demented maggot, most probably grab the wrong rod in your panic, and by the time you do get to the right rod, find that whatever was on the end of it has long gone.

Now who would do that then????

:oops:  :oops:  :oops:  :oops:

Edited by smufter

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