Jump to content

Recommended Posts

hi guys looking for some advice, I have decided that i am going to look to make my own lead weights as at the moment they are roughly £1 each and the odd one or two is cheap however, after a while they can get expensive if your buying several and i would be looking to make quite a few to help others out as well, can anyone point me in the right direction as to where i would get a mould etc from and a detailed guide on how to make them, also if anyone has had any previous experience making them any tips/bits to avoid would be great,

 

Many thanks,

 

Taddy.

Edited by Mr-jermy
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ventilation and a good respirator mask are essential. No joke. When I was making pyramid sinkers we made our mould by mixing autobody bondo in a cookie tin then shoving in greased commercially made weights just before it set. I stripped copper electrical wire and twisted it around a nail to make the inserts. I found that having more than 3 cavities was wasted effort because the lead in the dipper would get stiff and need re-heating after pouring 3. Spray the moulds with Pam between pours so they pop out easily.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I looked into making my own leads a few years ago and very soon realised that the capital outlay on moulds, release oil, heaters and all necessary materials would have made the leads far more expensive than buying them, and that was without factoring in my time/labour.

 

I buy mine. :wink:

 

Ian

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll post some pics of those pyramids, release oil is kitchen spray oil (Pam) and we melted the lead on the old Coleman. Pennies per because the lead was free. Unfortunately some drunk drove their car through the wall of the shop where we were storing the mould and lead and it was lost but easy peasy to start up again if we want to.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I make my own. But as Ian says, the initial outlay is not cheap. It is cheaper in the (Very) long run; but it is good to make your own none the less (And it's a good way to spend an afternoon that you can't get on the bank :wink: )

 

List of required materials:

 

 

Method:

  • Clamp the vice to the kitchen worktop.
  • Put a swivel in a loop and put the loop in the mould (Depending on the mould this may be two rather than one).
  • Put the lead in the melting pot and put it on the cooker (Make sure that there is no moisture whatsoever in the mix so that it doesn't spit.
  • Use the gas gun to heat the mould.
  • Wearing the welding glove remove the melting glove from the cooker.
  • Pour the molten lead into the mould, using the gas gun to ensure that the mould is kept nice and hot.
  • Get the mould out of the vice and release the leads.
  • Once the lead has cooled, use the stanley knife to trim the sides.
  • Hold the lead loop / swivel with the long nose pliers and heat it up with the gas gun.
  • Roll the lead in the lead coating powder.
  • Heat the lead again with the gas gun until the powder reaches the desired texture.
  • Run the lead under a cold tap.

You can mix the lead coating powder to get the colour you want and varying the time that you heat the lead after the powder has been coated will alter the texture of the lead from smooth to rough.

Edited by dalthegooner
Link to post
Share on other sites

Many thanks for the help looks like it is going to be more expensive than i first thought however i will still go for it and if i get good enough potentially sell them on as well to make some of the money back, will be searching ebay over the next few weeks to see how much i am looking to spend and how cheap i can get the bits for,

 

many thanks,

 

Taddy 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Always made my own, especially backleads which I seem to go through at a bonkers rate!?

 

Keep your eyes peeled for cheap moulds being sold off Taddy, they do come up now and again.

 

Excellent tutorial from Dal, I use an old thick steel pan as a melter on my sportster outside, and I was shown a nice little tip for mould release, smoke the mould with a candle before use so it goes black and the lead comes free cleanly every time.

I don't bother with coating, I just file and clean up then drop them in a bucket of rainwater for a couple of weeks.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would say it's a must to have a pan with pouring spouts to be sure you don't make a mess or get an injury from using fecking hot molten metal :wink:

 

You can use one out of the cupboard but whatever happens it can NEVER be used again for cooking (Both because you will trash it and because of the risk of lead poisoning).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Taddy you can press pretty much any old pan into service, but heat it up first and take to it with a hammer to make yourself a pouring spout. It won't be pretty but it will do the job.

 

Might want to wrap the handle with some heat proof material too, (Neoprene is good) as it all gets a bit warm when you're melting lead!

 

By the way your question RE the rainwater bucket, it will just darken the lead off nice and naturally, and prevent a white/grey oxide build up if you don't coat them.

People worrying over using uncoated leads makes me giggle, drop one at arms reach into your average lake margin that has anything other than shiny clean gravel, walk away and see if you can find it 5 mins later once the silt has settled back over it. (And if by a miracle you can, so what?)

There was a thread on here discussing fishing in soft silt, where one of the aims of the OP was to prevent the lead plugging in too far and dragging the hookbait under the silt with it. So that means your camo coated lead would be somewhere around 6-8 INCHES under the lakebed...

Link to post
Share on other sites

That sounds good I've got an old pan in my cupboard that i don't use anymore so will use that for it, don't worry i wont use it for food again haha, that sounds like a plan was thinking about taking a hammer to it to make a spout into it will make sure i heat it first to make it easier to use, the handle is plastic so doesn't get hot will that make a difference or should i still get something to go over it, i was also looking to get some heat proof gloves to do it in to help protect my hands,

 

that sounds good i think i'll do that for now ive got an old bucket in my garden currently full or rainwater that i was going to empty but will leave it full for now haha,

 

how long does it take for the lead to melt i know its a fairly soft metal so im presumming not very long at all?

 

many thanks for all of your help it is much appreciated :)

 

Taddy

Link to post
Share on other sites

Get a mask and do it in a well ventilated area or you can really hurt yourself. I poured leads outside and thought the slight breeze was enough to protect me but I didn't have a mask and the next day I had recurring stomach cramps that were very painfull. My friend and I went fishing and as we were leaving the city the pains began. I had him stop at a store and I bought a big jar of antacid suspension. - I chugged that stuff all day and it didn't touch it, extremely painfull and scary. He wanted to turn back and take me to emeegency. If you don't already have a good mask like this put it on top of your list. You can't tell how much of the fumes you're taking in while you do it.

b486b93a869f743c53c5de5eaf8dbffe.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah a mask is definitely on the to buy list and will be making them outside to keep it away from my son, i cant see the pics that you have posted not sure whether its restrictions on the works computers or if its not uploaded properly,

 

many thanks again for your help :)

 

Taddy 

Link to post
Share on other sites

just gone back to making my own after loosing my lead making kit first time round. i got everything i needed off ebay :wink: when you buy the moulds they come with instructions. i tend to do mine in small batches on a nice day, that way i can do them outside on the stove i use for my fishing.

 

http://northwestcarp.blogspot.co.uk/2008/11/making-lead-weights-for-fishing.html

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Phil , the Leadshed or carpy chris online are cheapy cheap if you buy a few , much like boilies really , or at least same bulk principle.

 

And it looks dangerous to me too.

CarpyChris gets my business :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

definitely a job you need to do carefully and buying online is way to go if you don't want any messing around. there is an upside to it though, once you've laid out for the gear your leads are nearly free from then on, I've sold enough off to recover my outlay on everything so mine cost nowt but a few hours of my time every now and again :wink:

Link to post
Share on other sites

just reading this thread and was wondering can you make the leads out of brass? If so i can nick the stuff by the bag load at work

 

I wouldn't advise you to take the scrap from work, but if you are going to anyway, sod chucking it in the lake, save it up and take it to the scrap yard.

Although working in engineering factories in the past, I can assure you they know just how much scrap and off cuts each job has left over and it is all part of the companies financial accounts.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't advise you to take the scrap from work, but if you are going to anyway, sod chucking it in the lake, save it up and take it to the scrap yard.

Although working in engineering factories in the past, I can assure you they know just how much scrap and off cuts each job has left over and it is all part of the companies financial accounts.

 

Not where I work it's too big a place

Link to post
Share on other sites

At the risk of getting the sack mate, Brass/Bronze is worth a fortune these days!

I used to work in engineering a long time ago too, and even then the offcuts and swarf saved up (We used to hoover the lathe beds clean before turning Bronze!) used to pay for a weekend out once a month... :wink:

 

But for making fishing weights, forget it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I can see your points in it being potentially cheaper and a lot easier to buy the lead weights rather than making them however if i get on ok with them and get good at it then i've got quite a few friends that go carp fishing and im sure they would buy them from me if they were good enough of course, will have a look and if i do make them i will post up some pics of them, 

 

many thanks,

 

Taddy

Link to post
Share on other sites

Go for it Taddy, so long as it's not costing you a fortune in moulds then it's hardly expensive for the rest. Get friendly with someone who works in a tyre place and ask them to bring you all the balance weights too. They are not pure lead but have a high content and are good for adding to the pot.

I've picked up a few moulds in old coastal sea fishing type shops that they were happy to part with for a fiver or so to get rid, so keep your eyes peeled on holidays!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...