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Miltz308

Pre Baiting

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Hi guys,

 

I plan to start fishing a lake next to my uni, its called the UEA broad. I have checked with the bailiff and he has enlightened me on the otter situation and after some thought I've decided to give it a go.

 

Anyway, this place is typically only fished by two-three anglers a night (or so the bailiff tells me) and is 18 acres in size. Its a man made lake dug out in the 1970s, and the lake record is 40lb+!!!

 

I was thinking of going down once or twice a week during the winter, and baiting up a few spots I am likely to start fishing towards the end of the winter (I won't get much chance to fish this this winter round).

 

My plan of action was going to be:

 

Spend a couple of hours on different swims plumbing around.  Try to make a mental map of the areas I want to fish, and then look for any underwater feature that may be worth a try. I was then planning, once or twice a week, to go and spomb half a kg of bait (a mixture of hemp, corn, halibut pellets and boilies, in order to give me a wide choice of hook bait when the time comes) on each of these areas.

 

What do you guys think??

 

Cheers,

Sam!

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First off your plan sounds like a good one

 

Maybe use a bit of watercraft to locate areas of the lake that might make good holding spots for winter, deep water, reed lines, sunken weedbeds areas that receive alot of sunlight etc .... , on visits make extensive notes either on your phone or in a notebook, fish shows, have people on the lake caught and where from (if they will tell you) you might have a good build up of info before you fish.

 

Drop the halibut pellets for winter there oil content is a bit on the high side, i would opt for something like a carp and course pellet coated in an attractor to match the boilies you are feeding if you want to use pellets.

 

Most of all good luck hope it works for you  :)

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I'm no expert on pre-baiting , far from it , but remember , some lakes virtually switch off in the winter so if you are going to pre-bait I'd be keeping the bait going in all through the winter but starting in the autumn .

Educate em to where the grub is when they're hungry and they may keep feeding throughout.

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Hi guys,

 

I plan to start fishing a lake next to my uni, its called the UEA broad. I have checked with the bailiff and he has enlightened me on the otter situation and after some thought I've decided to give it a go.

 

Anyway, this place is typically only fished by two-three anglers a night (or so the bailiff tells me) and is 18 acres in size. Its a man made lake dug out in the 1970s, and the lake record is 40lb+!!!

 

I was thinking of going down once or twice a week during the winter, and baiting up a few spots I am likely to start fishing towards the end of the winter (I won't get much chance to fish this this winter round).

 

My plan of action was going to be:

 

Spend a couple of hours on different swims plumbing around.  Try to make a mental map of the areas I want to fish, and then look for any underwater feature that may be worth a try. I was then planning, once or twice a week, to go and spomb half a kg of bait (a mixture of hemp, corn, halibut pellets and boilies, in order to give me a wide choice of hook bait when the time comes) on each of these areas.

 

What do you guys think??

 

Cheers,

Sam!

Pre baiting often helps to keep the fish rooting around for winter, but I would drop the halibut pellets.

 

Also you may find in winter carp hold up in specific areas year after year, so areas may be devoid of fish, yet some areas have a high concentration of fish.

 

No point in baiting the areas the carp are not :wink:

 

Sweetcorn is highly attractive, visible and can get numbers of fish on it.

The boilies I would make sure are a food source boilie rather than an attractor bait.

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I also wasn't planning on fishing much this winter, just trying to get the carp into areas ready for next years warmer weather!

As Nick's post alludes, piling in bait over the winter to spots which don't attract fish over the winter is pointless as the fish are simply not there.

 

Also, Nick has posted before about bait (Can't remember if it was pellets or boilies) that he has put into the margins and, because it hasn't been eaten, has totally ruined the spot where the bait hasn't broken down properly.

 

If you're not going to fish it until next year, and you can't be sure that the area is frequented by fish, I'd wait until spring to start the pre-baiting.

Edited by dalthegooner
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Ok Nick,

 

What kind of boilies would you suggest?

I also wasn't planning on fishing much this winter, just trying to get the carp into areas ready for next years warmer weather!

It likely wouldn't work to bait up to hold them in an area. Carp often have over wintering areas on each lake.

Taverham Mills is 20 odd acres, in winter nearly every carp in the lake stayed in the 2or3 acres around The Meadows.

 

Even on my local park lake, which is around an acre and a half, there is a spot most fish live in over winter, next to a particular line of rushes, which in this case, just happens to be the deepest part of the lake, but with the cleanest silt, near a bloodworm bed. The rest of the lake is often carp free, despite there being other rush beds.

 

What boilies do you plan on using next year?

That is the boilies I would start introducing now. It may put you onto making an early decision for next years bait!

You would be thinking about a food source bait, a bait the carp are comfortable eating, but which have some instant attraction.

 

I could give you loads of good baits, Trigga, 3D, Blue Oyster, Club, Seafood Takeaway, and more.

 

As Nick's post alludes, piling in bait over the winter to spots which don't attract fish over the winter is pointless as the fish are simply not there.

Also, Nick has posted before about bait (Can't remember if it was pellets or boilies) that he has put into the margins and, because it hasn't been eaten, has totally ruined the spot where the bait hasn't broken down properly.

If you're not going to fish it until next year, and you can't be sure that the area is frequented by fish, I'd wait until spring to start the pre-baiting.

As Nick's post alludes, piling in bait over the winter to spots which don't attract fish over the winter is pointless as the fish are simply not there.

Also, Nick has posted before about bait (Can't remember if it was pellets or boilies) that he has put into the margins and, because it hasn't been eaten, has totally ruined the spot where the bait hasn't broken down properly.

If you're not going to fish it until next year, and you can't be sure that the area is frequented by fish, I'd wait until spring to start the pre-baiting.

I think Dal is talking about this thread:

http://www.carp.com/topic/20303-how-good-are-pellets/?hl=pellets

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Just been looking at the Blue Oyster baits. The commercial fishery I fish on for a bit of fun every now and again love any squid flavoured baits, so I expect they could get on board with the Blue Oyster. And the UEA broad that I'm going to fish - I am under the impression that it is fished with a very large variety of baits already, so hopefully they would snap up the blue oyster?

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Ok, thanks Nick, I've taken that info on board.

 

I still haven't decided what bait to use next year at all. All the fisheries around me are largely fished using cell. I'd love to use a different kind of boillie to be a bit different but have no idea how to start introducing it to the lake!

Sam . I'd like to recommend CC Moore's live system . A similar bait to the Cell except it's good for them :):wink:

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Ok, thanks Nick, I've taken that info on board.

 

I still haven't decided what bait to use next year at all. All the fisheries around me are largely fished using cell. I'd love to use a different kind of boillie to be a bit different but have no idea how to start introducing it to the lake!

I'll try to give you a couple of ideas:

When I first started fishing Earith the season ticket started in June, but we were allowed down from mid May to look around. For 2 weeks before the start of the season I spent almost every other day with the marker rod finding features and mapping the lake. In areas I saw fish I put in some boilies (Trigga), and generally made sure that there was bait pretty much everywhere the fish went. I guess in that two weeks I went through 5 kilos of boilies pre baiting. For the next two years, I fished every week, usually for two nights, and every trip put in between 500 grams to a kilo of boilies as I left.

I honestly have no idea how many fish I caught in those two years, only a couple of blanks!

 

When I first started on Brackens I went down with a bait that I was field testing. I wasn't allowed to prebait before fishing, so my bait had to be a good instantly attractive bait, as well as a good food source.

I was baiting up with large stringers and bags of boilies, so there was a bed of bait, and when I left, sneaking bait in again on stringers as prebaiting for next time.

It was extremely unlikely that I could guarantee to be in any particular swim, so if I could sneak bait in in the corners or in the snags...

 

 

I fished Taverham for a number of years, when I first started a number of us got onto New Concepts Mariner Mix, and we all baited up as we left, all fished the same bait, we could pretty much guarantee to catch. The first winter nobody caught much at all, we all fished the areas we had done well in the summer, and ignored the swims closest to the lodge, The Meadows.

 

The next year because winter was so quiet, hardly anyone fished, so I tended to move around a bit more, and eventually found the carp in The Meadows, from November to March, I pretty much caught every trip.

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Sam . I'd like to recommend CC Moore's live system . A similar bait to the Cell except it's good for them :):wink:

What's in the cell that makes it not good for the fish Tim? I keep hearing people say it's no good for the fish but with the amount that gets put into waters up and down the country, I would have thought that fish would be going belly up if it was bad for them? As you know, I don't use mainline as I feel there are baits more suited out there to my angling, but we need to be careful of what we are saying when slating a bait, or any company's products coming to think of it. Especially if there is no evidence provided with the allegations.

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What's in the cell that makes it not good for the fish Tim? I keep hearing people say it's no good for the fish but with the amount that gets put into waters up and down the country, I would have thought that fish would be going belly up if it was bad for them? As you know, I don't use mainline as I feel there are baits more suited out there to my angling, but we need to be careful of what we are saying when slating a bait, or any company's products coming to think of it. Especially if there is no evidence provided with the allegations.

I was kidding Nige .

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