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crusian

Using A Marker Float

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I've got another question please .

 

I struggle with my marker float .

I'm not used to casting a 3oz lead out , and the fact that even though I'm wearing a finger stall I still worry about cutting my fingers .

 

Anyway I've just noticed :roll:  that ESP sell a Sonar Mini Marker with the recommended weights 1 - 3 oz .

So I guess that as long as you use enough weight to comfortably sink the marker float you will get the job done ? .

 

A second question is ;

The picture accompanying the ESP Mini Marker shows it being used with a Pear Lead ? i.e. no  ridges nor knobbly bits that are claimed to transmit more information about the lake bed .

So would I be better off using a specialised Marker Lead  ? .

 

Ta .

 

:wink:  

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A light lead will give you less feedback than a heavier one, and lift off the bottom more.

 

Different types of lead for marker work in different situations and casting distances, and over different lake beds.

 

3oz is a pretty light casting weight really. You'll get used to it. Keep going, I'm sure you won't lose any fingers! :wink:

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I use a 3 or 3.5oz lead with my marker float, a plain basic tournament lead, with a 30lb Amnesia shock leader to braid mainline.

 

The reason I use the mono leader is reduce the risk of crack-offs, protect my finger from cuts from braid, and it also reduces tangles when the braid twists around the marker etc.

 

So it is a run ring on the line, with a length of Amnesia down to the lead, and below the run ring on the line, 2 rubber shock beads to protect the knot to the link clip attached to the float.

 

The heavy lead means I can feel the bottom, the changes between weed, silt, gravel etc, and it means the float doesn't lift the lead of the bottom.

 

The ESP mini marker is a good marker float, but I do sometimes struggle to see the orange tip in the waves, and the black tip is just as bad, so I also use a bright yellow Atomic one at times.

 

I haven't bought a marker float for ages, (years in fact), I have found the ones I use, usually attached to braid where someone has cracked off!

I found one on my last trip to Brackens, stuck in the weed, attached to plain straight mono.

 

The Korda Marker Float is also good, but I would suggest, look in the Pike section of your tackle shop, and buy a bottom only pike float, they are cheaper than carp marker floats.

 

A pear or a tournament lead I have found best, they cast furthest, although a dimpled lead may pick up the bottom better, although my lead I can see when I bring it in, usually has some silt on it where I have dragged it back.

 

 

 

 

*Quick edit, the shock leader is the length of my casting drop, plus a minimum of 4 times round the reel spool, and I try to get the knot at the back of the spool

I've got another question please .

 

I struggle with my marker float .

I'm not used to casting a 3oz lead out , and the fact that even though I'm wearing a finger stall I still worry about cutting my fingers .

 

Anyway I've just noticed :roll: that ESP sell a Sonar Mini Marker with the recommended weights 1 - 3 oz .

So I guess that as long as you use enough weight to comfortably sink the marker float you will get the job done ? .

 

A second question is ;

The picture accompanying the ESP Mini Marker shows it being used with a Pear Lead ? i.e. no ridges nor knobbly bits that are claimed to transmit more information about the lake bed .

So would I be better off using a specialised Marker Lead ? .

 

Ta .

 

:wink:

 

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Those purpose made marker leads with knobbly bits are, IMO, a complete waste of money. Any lead with a flat(ish) profile e.g. pear or dumpy type will give you perfectly good feedback. As said, once you're used to marking a simple tournament style lead will do the job.

I don't use marker floats at all anymore. After years of using one I now feel I can guesstimate the depth based on the time it takes for the lead to hit the deck. When I've checked with floats I've found I'm normally very accurate up to ~ 14 ft depth. Reasonably accurate after that.

Within reason I don't think depth is all that important - more the difference between depths in a given lake. As long as you're able to find general depths and the transitions between them (very important), plus any features, you have what you need to catch carp.

Once you've found your spot I can't see a need for the float itself. Clip the rods/spod up and you're away. For spots closer in I just attach a little dissolving rig foam on the rig and use it as a target for the catty when it reaches the surface.

 

So it is a run ring on the line, with a length of Amnesia down to the lead, and below the run ring on the line, 2 rubber shock beads to protect the knot to the link clip attached to the float.

 

When I did use marker floats I found that if I put the lead on a boom I'd often not detect lighter weed (light enough to get a drop on). If you get rid of the boom the lead will pull the float right down into any light weed. Often you'll find the float wont climb to the surface which indicates the spot may not be presentable (where with a boom you'd have thought it was). If it does climb to the surface, spot on.....

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Hi Yonny 

Thanks , that's very helpful .

 

Yonny when you " guesstimate the depth …. " do you stop the Marker Rod on the cast at the one o'clock position and engage the bale arm the instant the lead hits the waters' surface , then watch the rod top while you  count - one mississippi , 2 mississippi etc ? .

I'm having problems , I guess I need to practice , practice , practice :wink: . 

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I must admit I do use the marker float almost every session, even every day to bait up and cast to. I like the accuracy (allowing for the swing in towards the rod tip) that it gives. Some of my spots are very small, tiny silt patches adjacent to weed, gravel, or gravel patches next to weed beds.

 

I do prefer using the leadlink, even in weed I can feel it, maybe it's because I do retrieve very slowly, and watch the tip as well as feeling the lakebed, so I don't think it's a disadvantage. I also like reeling in the weed, where it gets trapped around the base of the float and the lead etc. It means I can see what type of weed it is (even if I can't name it), and what natural food is in there as well.

 

I know that roughly 1 second equals approximately 1 metre as it drops through the water with a lead alone, but even so I still prefer to use the float, as it means I can pinpoint the spot accurately as opposed to being off by guesstimating where the lead is. I think the only spot you can accurately hit is where the lead landed first, whereas the marker float means you can get any spot on the retrieve accurately. It also means a few casts left and right I can feel what is around the spot I'm fishing.

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do you stop the Marker Rod on the cast at the one o'clock position and engage the bale arm the instant the lead hits the waters' surface , then watch the rod top while you  count - one mississippi , 2 mississippi etc ? .

It's best to feather (slow) the line with your finger against the spool as the lead approaches the target. Then trap the line entirely just before the lead hits the water. This ensures the lead lands on a tighter line so you can feel the line go slack when the lead hits the deck. I can't say I do count tbh but there is no doubt that is a method that would work (and you can check it with the float).

 

 

I also like reeling in the weed, where it gets trapped around the base of the float and the lead etc. It means I can see what type of weed it is (even if I can't name it), and what natural food is in there as well.

 

Spot on fella. The waters I fish in the Nene Valley can get so weedy your clear spots are basically just less weedy areas.... Pulling in the weed and checking the type and length of the tendrils is vital to determining how to present your bait. As you say it's also nice to know what naturals you're competing against or possibly trying to imitate....

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