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Anyone routinely sharpen their own hooks? Before or during a session?

 

Just picked up a kit and had a play with some fox and some Korda hooks. It's ridiculous how sharp you can get a hook compared to how it comes out of the packet! Admittedly the point won't last as long, but it won't take long to give each hook a few passes every 12/24 hours or so. Fresh and twice as sharp each chuck.

 

May be reluctant to go stupid sharp if the hook is likely to be on the deck over a gravel bottom. Can see the point turning over a lot easier. Any other time though mine will now be going out pin sharp! Time will tell if it converts more pickups into runs. :D

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I actually question sharpening hooks for fishing.

 

If a brand of hook is not sharp enough, don't use them!

 

If you sharpen a hook, then you are actually increasing the chance of the extra sharpened hook cutting or pulling its way free, potentially increasing hookpulls.

Add to that, obviously you know that you the finer the point the more chance of it being blunted, or bending over.

 

I don't think that my hooks need sharpening, I use them straight out the packet.

A few years ago now, I put a hook on a rig, and cast it out. That hook caught me a 26lb mirror. I then took that same rig back to a local water, where it was used again, and landed a load more fish until I eventually lost or blunted it.

In between fish it was rebaited, recast no sharpening.

 

Since then I have landed hundreds of fish from a variety of waters on hooks straight out of the packet.

 

As an aside for you, ask yourself, you know some tackle is sold to make money for tackle manufacturers, there is no need for it; how much do I really need to sharpen hooks so going out and buying a hook sharpening kit...

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I actually question sharpening hooks for fishing.

If a brand of hook is not sharp enough, don't use them!

If you sharpen a hook, then you are actually increasing the chance of the extra sharpened hook cutting or pulling its way free, potentially increasing hookpulls.

Add to that, obviously you know that you the finer the point the more chance of it being blunted, or bending over.

I don't think that my hooks need sharpening, I use them straight out the packet.

A few years ago now, I put a hook on a rig, and cast it out. That hook caught me a 26lb mirror. I then took that same rig back to a local water, where it was used again, and landed a load more fish until I eventually lost or blunted it.

In between fish it was rebaited, recast no sharpening.

Since then I have landed hundreds of fish from a variety of waters on hooks straight out of the packet.

As an aside for you, ask yourself, you know some tackle is sold to make money for tackle manufacturers, there is no need for it; how much do I really need to sharpen hooks so going out and buying a hook sharpening kit...

Arguments for and against as with everything. Apart from when fishing with the hook likely to be in amongst the gravel, I can't see why you wouldn't want the sharpest hook possible. Looking through a pack of ten hooks, previously I'd chuck a couple that didn't come up to standard. Now these can all be used.

 

I'm not saying a decent sharp hook out of the pack won't catch fish. Of course it will, we've all been doing it from the birth of fishing until recently, but I think it's generally accepted that for every actual run, our hook bait is being picked up multiple times, anything we can do to get the number of runs closer to the number of pick ups has to be good.

 

Think it was Kevin Nash that said when he started sharpening hooks the first thing he noticed was different hook holds. Some were in the bottom lip, some weren't. The logic being that previously any pickup where the hook doesn't act exactly as we would like and flip into the ideal position would result in the bait being dealt with without a bleep. With sharper hooks these takes were catching and resulting in fish. On a lake where your bait is going to get picked up 20 times in a day resulting in 5 or so fish, probably not too much of a problem. If you're getting picked up once or twice in a week if your lucky, if you can up your odds of converting a pick up to a run its a big deal.

 

Not gonna revolutionise your fishing, sure. But little improvements add up. :)

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Actually there was a time when hooks needed sharpening!

It is since the advent of chemical sharpening that most don't need sharpening, although some brands...

 

The low water Salmon blob hooks were just one example.

 

 

 

That sharpest hook possible, I mentioned it in a previous post, can actually cut itself out of the mouth.

Another point with that, you have taken off the protective coating, whatever it may be, the Teflon, PTFE, or may be just the 'skin', in areas other than gravel these can blunt off overnight in some waters. You increase the risk of a point turning over, and on one silty lake I fished, swan mussels would burr over almost any point, and even avoiding them you would notice a hook blunting after being in the lake overnight in the silt.

 

Arguments for and against as with everything. Apart from when fishing with the hook likely to be in amongst the gravel, I can't see why you wouldn't want the sharpest hook possible. Looking through a pack of ten hooks, previously I'd chuck a couple that didn't come up to standard. Now these can all be used.

I'm not saying a decent sharp hook out of the pack won't catch fish. Of course it will, we've all been doing it from the birth of fishing until recently, but I think it's generally accepted that for every actual run, our hook bait is being picked up multiple times, anything we can do to get the number of runs closer to the number of pick ups has to be good.

Think it was Kevin Nash that said when he started sharpening hooks the first thing he noticed was different hook holds. Some were in the bottom lip, some weren't. The logic being that previously any pickup where the hook doesn't act exactly as we would like and flip into the ideal position would result in the bait being dealt with without a bleep. With sharper hooks these takes were catching and resulting in fish. On a lake where your bait is going to get picked up 20 times in a day resulting in 5 or so fish, probably not too much of a problem. If you're getting picked up once or twice in a week if your lucky, if you can up your odds of converting a pick up to a run its a big deal.

Not gonna revolutionise your fishing, sure. But little improvements add up. :)

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Actually there was a time when hooks needed sharpening!

It is since the advent of chemical sharpening that most don't need sharpening, although some brands...

The low water Salmon blob hooks were just one example.

That sharpest hook possible, I mentioned it in a previous post, can actually cut itself out of the mouth.

Another point with that, you have taken off the protective coating, whatever it may be, the Teflon, PTFE, or may be just the 'skin', in areas other than gravel these can blunt off overnight in some waters. You increase the risk of a point turning over, and on one silty lake I fished, swan mussels would burr over almost any point, and even avoiding them you would notice a hook blunting after being in the lake overnight in the silt.

But this is contradictory.

 

On one hand, some hooks are sharper than others, with the sharpest being best.

 

On the other hand, if a hook is too sharp it can be detrimental.

 

So are you saying there is a fine line of sharpness where a hook must be sharp enough but not too sharp? I think this is pretty subjective, and probably based on favouring the properties of one brand or type. You can't say "some hooks aren't sharp enough" then say that sharpening them is detrimental.

 

Only just started out with this hand sharpening lark. Think I'll start with as sharp as I can get, and experiment from there.

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But this is contradictory.

On one hand, some hooks are sharper than others, with the sharpest being best.

On the other hand, if a hook is too sharp it can be detrimental.

So are you saying there is a fine line of sharpness where a hook must be sharp enough but not too sharp? I think this is pretty subjective, and probably based on favouring the properties of one brand or type. You can't say "some hooks aren't sharp enough" then say that sharpening them is detrimental.

Only just started out with this hand sharpening lark. Think I'll start with as sharp as I can get, and experiment from there.

Some brands of hook simply are not as sharp as others.

 

The sharpest I have found are Drennan/ESP who also own Kamasan, then Gamakatsu, Owner, Gardner and Solar. I did also find Carp-R-Us Centurions and Nailers sharp enough.

These hooks do NOT need to be sharpened, they are already sharp enough. Now of course if you use other brands then I am suggesting swap those brands to one that is already sharp enough as above.

Somewhere on the forum is a picture with a 3oz lead being lifted off the desk with the hook point resting on my thumb of finger. That was a Korda hook I think straight out the packet, definitely not a sharp brand!

 

 

And yes, Owner FLB hooks were actually too sharp, the spade shaped point did actually cut down the mouth where it pr icked in and took hold

 

My point was that the last hooks that I needed to sharpen were the Low Water Salmon Hooks, you cut the shank, put a solder blob on the top as your hooklink stop and tied it to your nylon, this was before the days of chemical sharpening, or maybe Mustad 34021's needed a touch up.

 

A hook does not dig in on the pick-up or as the carp attempts to eject it, no matter how sharp it is.

Basically the hook digs in as you play the fish, as you tighten the line and strike.

 

Hook sharpening is a fad of sorts. Someone did it, made articles about it, and it has become as fashion, because JAG, Gardner or whoever can now sell hook sharpening files, lights and magnifying glasses to anglers.

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Hook sharpening is a fad of sorts. Someone did it, made articles about it, and it has become as fashion, because JAG, Gardner or whoever can now sell hook sharpening files, lights and magnifying glasses to anglers.

Yeah fair point, and most probably true.

 

Good fun though, and satisfying. Something to do on the bank too when it's pitch dark and cold. Time will tell if it helps or hinders.

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I was looking for a pen, just a black one really. Tried using a sharpie but it rubs off too easy. Thought it might dissolve in the water. What ones do you use Adam? Will any permanent marker do mate?

Your not supposed to eat or smoke them...lol

The sharpening kit I got is by Pinpoint Hooks, they also do a product called an "end game marker" specifically designed for the shiney bit created by sharpening hooks to stop glint and corrosion. You get 3 in a pack, green brown and black, for about a tenner so not much more than a few sharpies and designed for the job. The hooks look good coloured up. Not tried one in a lake yet, so will report back later in the week when I've had a chance to get one wet. :)

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  • 4 years later...

Hook sharpening is a must on pressured waters as it will give you an edge, but it must be penetration sharp, not just pin sharp at the point, the way to test this is through the top layer of skin (Epidermis) where there are no nerves, if the hook goes through like butter it is penetration sharp, this will give a better chance of catching a wary carp one that uses the weight to aid ejecting the hook, penetration sharp stops this and produces a run.

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