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spr1985

How long and why

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So I'm intrigued as to how the rest of you go about things in winter mainly but feel free to expand into other seasons.

 

1) assuming very low activity levels, how long do you guys spend walking the banks looking for signs of fish?

 

2) assuming a complete lack of giving themselves away, how do you make your swim choice and how long do you stay in said swim without any activity

 

 

I spent 1.5 hours on Sunday morning walking round my lakes with only one show to go on (in the out of bounds) so..... I set up in the swim closest to the out of bounds and told myself I'd give it until 13:30 and move if their was no activity. I had a couple of liners and an aborted run so decided to stay in the swim......as per usual it resulted in a blank [emoji52]. I'm starting to feel like I'm doing something horribly wrong. So thought I'd ask you guys how you do it.

 

 

Fire away chaps....

 

 

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Im looking all day, Im constantly listening for abnormal bird behavior. I set up in my swim through previous expeditions and experience, if i hear/see anything i move. Thats all you can do really, winters more luck really. You can show up and for whatever reason be it weather,pressure,wind the fish will be in front of you. BUT on another day the conditions are exactly the same and not a sniff

 

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Key to fishing any swim at any time of year depends on a number of variables, loose feed and how you put it in can mean the difference between catching or not.

next time you go, try keeping the bait going in regular and in small amounts, catapult single boilies over your rig, at this time of year five-ish bolies per hour would be about right, spend 20-30 mins putting them out, one at a time, see if there is any kind of reaction. 

 

Staying late into the evening would also help, the water will be at its warmest in the evening, after the sun has warmed the surface during the day, that warm water will make its way to the bottom, bound to be dark by then, bite time at this point in in the year will be a short affair, it is a question of having a bait near them at the right time.

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Key to fishing any swim at any time of year depends on a number of variables, loose feed and how you put it in can mean the difference between catching or not.

next time you go, try keeping the bait going in regular and in small amounts, catapult single boilies over your rig, at this time of year five-ish bolies per hour would be about right, spend 20-30 mins putting them out, one at a time, see if there is any kind of reaction.

 

Staying late into the evening would also help, the water will be at its warmest in the evening, after the sun has warmed the surface during the day, that warm water will make its way to the bottom, bound to be dark by then, bite time at this point in in the year will be a short affair, it is a question of having a bait near them at the right time.

Trying that saturday, good tip

 

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I will give your tips a try carpbell thanks [emoji6] I was there from 7am (it was dark) and I stayed until 19:15 again it was way past dark, unfortunately a 3:30am alarm for work meant I couldn't stay later

 

 

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Edited by spr1985

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Winter angling is like a different sport at times. In spring, summer and autumn I'll spend as long as is required to find fish, be it 10 mins, an hour, or 5 hours, eventually I'll find them. That is not always the case in winter.

Normally I'll head straight to an area of consistent depth near (not in) the deepest water, passing to check any snags or shallower areas (if it's sunny) on the way. I'll set-up slowly keeping my eyes peeled for signs. If I see something I'll be on the move immediately.

I find at this time of year your best chance of spotting something is when it gets dark so that's when I'll really be on it.

For me any show in winter is worth 50 in summer. They shoal up particularly so in winter so if you can find one chances are you've found a few. A single roll/jump tells me that at some point they'll be feeding nearby, they have to, they're active.

If I can get on a show, I'll stay there until action elsewhere tells me I need to move.

 

I spent 1.5 hours on Sunday morning walking round my lakes with only one show to go on (in the out of bounds) so..... I set up in the swim closest to the out of bounds and told myself I'd give it until 13:30 and move if their was no activity. I had a couple of liners and an aborted run so decided to stay in the swim......as per usual it resulted in a blank [emoji52]. I'm starting to feel like I'm doing something horribly wrong. 

Take a step back and read that back to yourself Spr.... you're doing something very right. You spotted the fish (which I find is the hardest bit in winter), you fished for them, had a few occurrences, including an aborted take. Basically it went like clockwork right up until the point the hook didn't set, which is par for the course in carp angling (we're getting done all the time IMO).

 

At the end of the day winter is just difficult. Feeding periods can be as short as an hour every 24, so you could be on fish all day and not know about it. Once you've figured it out it can be easy, but that process of figuring it out can take all winter. Sounds to me like you're on the right track mate.

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as yonny said, feeding times can be very short, maybe even half an hour or less. You found the fish and got as close to them as you could. It was just the hook not setting that resulted in the blank. In winter I will really keep an eye on my hook points as bites are few and far between (depending on where you fish) so it's even more critical that hook and rig are working effectively. 

 

At the moment I have given a rest on the lake I am fishing and hitting the day ticket venues to keep me sane. One of which has a hotspot, put a bait out there and you'll catch, simple. Known winter hotspots are a good place to start if you cant find the fish on the day, or just go with what feels right to you. I've stood in swims and gone "yes this is the one" before and had some great sessions, I have also blanked so being mobile is key. 

 

I find fishing for a bite at a time works for me in winter. a 50p sized mesh bag of crushed boilies with a handful of boilies around the hookbait is enough for me, and I will repeat after a capture/missed take.

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Spr, am I right in saying this water is very close to your home? If so, have you considered a little winter baiting campaign? Something is clearly still active in the water, which is to be expected given the up and down yet mild weather. If you know where the carp are try popping half a kilo every other day in (I'd go with a decent boilie, gives them plenty of energy and is quick and easy to bait up with), or even quarter of a kilo every day, should be just enough to keep them moving. If it works, you might well empty the place.

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Exactly rite mate, within ten minutes of my house but unfortunately due to my work in spend Monday from 4am to Friday afternoon away from home most weeks up and down the country so as much of a good idea that is I can't physically do it

 

 

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Lol.

I asked the Mrs, half jokingly, if she wanted to learn how to tie rigs last week. She said YES!!!!!

I don't know if I'm happy about it or not. On one hand if she's good at it I can have her tying up hinges with her female pheromones. Problem is if I start catching on the female rigs will it become one of those confidence things that I can't do without?

On the other hand what if I use one of her rigs and it goes at the knot and I lose a biggun? Surely that would bring and end to our relationship? Can't have that, I'm quite fond of her.

Ah... the trails and tribulations of a carp angler....

 

Anyway, back on track..... winter..... 'ard innit!

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Lol.

I asked the Mrs, half jokingly, if she wanted to learn how to tie rigs last week. She said YES!!!!!

I don't know if I'm happy about it or not. On one hand if she's good at it I can have her tying up hinges with her female pheromones. Problem is if I start catching on the female rigs will it become one of those confidence things that I can't do without?

On the other hand what if I use one of her rigs and it goes at the knot and I lose a biggun? Surely that would bring and end to our relationship? Can't have that, I'm quite fond of her.

Ah... the trails and tribulations of a carp angler....

 

Anyway, back on track..... winter..... 'ard innit!

:lol:

 

 

 

Spr...... how much bait have you been using while fishing & when you leave ?

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When I went on Sunday I used about 2/3 of a kilo, some ground up, some crumbled some halves and some whole (boilies) over two spots over the space of twelve hours,

 

Thought I should add all but the whole boilies went out in pva mesh.

 

The whole boilies went out in the catapult over the rough area 7 over each area at a time,

 

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Edited by spr1985

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I would up the bait going in personally..... you've been sticking with this spot , & you know the fish are close by in the out of bounds. Next time you leave put 2 or 3 kilos out on one spot then fish both rods tight on it next time .

You will have to judge how much to use on the day depending on the gap between visits.

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I would say you had signals of fish in the area, you had indications, therefore you were in the right spot.

 

Sadly you didn't land a fish or get a hook up.

 

In winter carp (and other species) can congregate in particular areas, and it can be the same spot year after year. These areas can be dead weed or lily beds, near rushes, gravel bars and drop-offs, or snags, maybe even natural food spots like bloodworm beds.

 

When fishing I would drop and reduce the whole baits, more fish with a smell, ground boilies, or even a smelly groundbait, with only a few whole baits around the hook, but bait up with plenty when you leave.

Winter my stringers drop to two or three boilies alongside the hook bait, unless I know that they will eat loads, bug even then the fewer baits, more chance of a pick up.

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As the location part is so critical in winter I'd always try to get in a swim with a good view of the lake.  Just one show could be the key to winter fishing on that water - Its likely to be the right area year after year for whatever reason.

 

Once you've found the main holding area you can start to identify bite time, so short sessions for a few hours become worth while and often rewarding.

 

I learnt this the hard way after a couple of winters struggling in my favourite corner of the lake, for a grand total of jack.  Moved to the main body one day saw a show, moved on it and nailed the water from then on, catching as regular as clockwork, week after week.

 

I've recently joined a winter syndicate and on the first overnighter I decided to fish the biggest swim in the biggest area of the lake, based purely on seeing the majority of the water from there.

 

I spread the 3 rods as wide and far out as I could get away with, fishing for liners I guess, got the locals muttering between themselves.  Fished pop- ups over a good spread of baits, got the locals muttering again, had 4 takes the following morning landing 3, deffo got the locals.....

 

Now I know bite time the next session will be day only.  If you don't see any fish or subtle signs study the bird activity they give the game away.  My first sighting of a winter roll was a yard behind a flock of ducks and that was often the case.

 

 

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So I'm intrigued as to how the rest of you go about things in winter mainly but feel free to expand into other seasons.

 

1) assuming very low activity levels, how long do you guys spend walking the banks looking for signs of fish?

 

2) assuming a complete lack of giving themselves away, how do you make your swim choice and how long do you stay in said swim without any activity

 

 

I spent 1.5 hours on Sunday morning walking round my lakes with only one show to go on (in the out of bounds) so..... I set up in the swim closest to the out of bounds and told myself I'd give it until 13:30 and move if their was no activity. I had a couple of liners and an aborted run so decided to stay in the swim......as per usual it resulted in a blank [emoji52]. I'm starting to feel like I'm doing something horribly wrong. So thought I'd ask you guys how you do it.

 

 

Fire away chaps....

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I would spend aslong as i thort i should be looking giving the conditions ... if the lake has half a lid on it i dnt expect to see much if anything ... if its abit warmer ill spend abit longer looking.

 

If its a smallish pit i will always do 2 laps big pits i will do 1 lap but spend more time going round.

 

The key in winter is to find the fish but if you have exhausted looking then i would opt to fish the back of any wind ... if the suns out i would look for the shallower spots as they will be warmer.

 

I dnt think you done anything wrong on that day ... you found the fish ... in winter 1 show is enuff to find them ... you put a bait in that area ... we have all had days without so much as a bleep ... you had liners and an aborted run i would of stayed put aswell ... i just think you was unlucky ... the carp gods are always teasting our resolve.

 

My only bit of advice is always keep you eyes on the water ... dont sit on your hands and if you see fish showing elsewhere then be prepared to up sticks and move.

 

Dean

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I would agree with much of this, but I would disagree about being on the back of the wind.

 

In winter a big south westerly can be a warm wind, so I would actually often fish in the north eastern end of the lake if I didn't know the fish holding areas of the lake.

The northern end of the lake can be 'sheltered' from the northerly winds, so is actually a good place to start looking if there are no obvious features.

 

A few years ago, just after a thaw the lake coloured up, and I thought I saw a swirl on my 'circuit' of the lake. I say circuit, as I intended to walk all of the bank, but either my imagination, hunch or perceived swirl gave me the location, so I set up and fished a spot about 30 metres out. The result was 3 20's and a double over a four day trip.

 

 

 

 

I would spend aslong as i thort i should be looking giving the conditions ... if the lake has half a lid on it i dnt expect to see much if anything ... if its abit warmer ill spend abit longer looking.

If its a smallish pit i will always do 2 laps big pits i will do 1 lap but spend more time going round.

The key in winter is to find the fish but if you have exhausted looking then i would opt to fish the back of any wind ... if the suns out i would look for the shallower spots as they will be warmer.

I dnt think you done anything wrong on that day ... you found the fish ... in winter 1 show is enuff to find them ... you put a bait in that area ... we have all had days without so much as a bleep ... you had liners and an aborted run i would of stayed put aswell ... i just think you was unlucky ... the carp gods are always teasting our resolve.

My only bit of advice is always keep you eyes on the water ... dont sit on your hands and if you see fish showing elsewhere then be prepared to up sticks and move.

Dean

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I would agree with much of this, but I would disagree about being on the back of the wind.

 

In winter a big south westerly can be a warm wind, so I would actually often fish in the north eastern end of the lake if I didn't know the fish holding areas of the lake.

The northern end of the lake can be 'sheltered' from the northerly winds, so is actually a good place to start looking if there are no obvious features.

 

A few years ago, just after a thaw the lake coloured up, and I thought I saw a swirl on my 'circuit' of the lake. I say circuit, as I intended to walk all of the bank, but either my imagination, hunch or perceived swirl gave me the location, so I set up and fished a spot about 30 metres out. The result was 3 20's and a double over a four day trip.

 

 

 

 

 

Good going in winter that ... i was saying that as a basic guide without going into too much depth as sitting behind the wind in most cases is a good starting option ... but yes if it was a warmer wind you would not wanna be behind it.

 

 

 

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