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TheKingTench

Using light leads

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Hi,

I mostly only fish to around 50-60 yards max (at the moment), and I'm finding the 2oz leads to be a bit too much on my 2.75 TC rods. I find I have to do really half arsed casts, otherwise I miss my mark by some way. Could I step it down to 1oz? I fish a running rig, so lead weight should not be that important? As opposed to a bolt rig, I mean.

Thanks!

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This is exactly the way I fish and I've never had any problems with it. 1oz leads with a running rig. Perfect set up for lower test curve rods (mine are 2.25's).
Two little tips to aid hooking.......
If you use a bait runner, set it a little bit tighter than normal, not too tight that the fish can't strip line, but let it have a little more tension.
Also, if you have line clips on your rods, use them. I am a firm believer that the initial "ping" when the line is pulled from the line clip is akin to the resistance that a fish would feel when it hits the lead, and helps set the hook.
This also has the added benefit of letting you know if you've been "done" if you are distracted for a moment and miss an initial take, say nipping off for a wee or something.
If the line is out of the clip, you know something has happened in your absence.
I'm not advocating leaving your rods by the way, but we all get distracted from time to time for whatever reason.

If you don't have line clips on your rods, you can buy these.....  http://www.ericsangling.co.uk/greys-universal-line-clip.html   They work. My previous rods had no line clips and I fitted these, they were perfect.

Edited by smufter

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51 minutes ago, TheKingTench said:

Might try some 1oz leads.

 

I take it I don't need to use my bobbins when fishing a running rig? 

Errrr.....I always use bobbins because you'll still get drop backs. 

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15 minutes ago, TheKingTench said:

Not on a running rig? The lead wont move, and just acts as a sort of pivot point? 

You would need a heavy lead for it not to move at all, a lighter lead would be picked up and slide back up the line a little on the take giving what would sound like a single toner on the alarm. I nearly always fish running rigs with various size leads and it does give better bite indication in my opinion. You still need a bobbin swinger etc to keep the line that bit taught over the alarm for it to register better.

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Just spend 1 1/2 hours freezing in the garden testing various lead weights, bobbins ect. Seems the setup works better with the bobbins, though the 3oz flat pear leads did not move an inch when simulating a drop back. 

Bobbins never 'dropped back' so to speak, but they gave better indication. Dropped back down with bleeps when I stopped moving the rig.

Will keep bobbins. 

Girlfriend also thinks I'm "really weird" and "obsessed" lol

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1 hour ago, TheKingTench said:

Just spend 1 1/2 hours freezing in the garden testing various lead weights, bobbins ect. Seems the setup works better with the bobbins, though the 3oz flat pear leads did not move an inch when simulating a drop back. 

Bobbins never 'dropped back' so to speak, but they gave better indication. Dropped back down with bleeps when I stopped moving the rig.

Will keep bobbins. 

Girlfriend also thinks I'm "really weird" and "obsessed" lol

Tip of the iceberg though, isn't it?  This little bit of mechanics is just part of the big picture.  Get her out on the bank in the Spring when it's nicer and with a bit of luck after she lands a few she'll be the same.

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47 minutes ago, buzzbomb said:

Tip of the iceberg though, isn't it?  This little bit of mechanics is just part of the big picture.  Get her out on the bank in the Spring when it's nicer and with a bit of luck after she lands a few she'll be the same.

I see you are from Regina? 

Here is one of my snaps whilst spinning on the River Saskatchewan

10570432_10154506321780023_7397716503284684051_n.jpg

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 I can hit 80 yards with a 2oz lead on 2.75 lb rods so they are not undergunned for the leads.... Seriously... I'd look at your casting technique if you are struggling to hit 60 yards with 2oz and 2.75lb combo... that said I have gone over to lighter leads for this season... using only leads light enough to get my rig where I want it.... as low as 1/3 of an ounce... it stems from seeing a fish get rid of a 2.5oz COG lead  in the margins.... I'm hoping that the fish won't be able to use the weight of the lead to shed the hook

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1 hour ago, bluelabel said:

  I'd look at your casting technique if you are struggling to hit 60 yards with 2oz and 2.75lb combo

He's got the distance, just not the accuracy.  Look at your casting technique anyway.  :D  The main hazard to practicing casting in public spaces like parks and school yards or sports fields is small children mocking and reminding you that there are no fish there.

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7 hours ago, TheKingTench said:

Not on a running rig? The lead wont move, and just acts as a sort of pivot point? 

Trust me. I've had plenty of drop backs using light leads. I've never used a 3oz lead in my life, 2oz has been the maximum. And I still get 'em.....;-) 

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20 minutes ago, kevtaylor said:

Not when its 1oz it doesn't stay put - you must be kidding, the theory is right but that's with a heavy lead

A light lead will move, whereas a heavy lead will not.

It may actually be the fact that the light lead does move on a running lead that causes confusion. Moorsey (Keith Moors of Moorland Lakes) uses and recommends light running leads. 

Light running leads can lead to dropbacks because the lead does move, yet change that to a heavy lead, and that dropback does not happen, it becomes a run, because  the lead does not move.

 

I say dropbacks don't happen with heavy leads, for some reason, bream can give dropbacks:?

 

Like Smufter, I like the line in a line clip with the slack line, nice 'strike' basically pulling the hook home further.

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Tomorrow I'm fishing an easy commercial 1.5 acre lakes with no snags. Most of the carp are up to 10lbs, with plenty of bream and tench. Jusg going to fish a running rig, 2oz lead and tight lines. Am a little tempted to fish slack and use a heavier lead.

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I would say that it's better to fish tight with a running lead than slack , use your heavy leads for bolts and semi fixed on slack lines ... I fished today on a easy lake, but couldn't find the fish the only show I did see was after I had packed up and was having a last walk round .... Good luck for tomorrow mate 😋

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i personally use a lot of 1.5oz leads and they are set up so that the lead is completely free running.

my method is to put the lead and insert onto mainline then tie on a #8 swivel with a large ring, your hook link attaches to the large ring.

using this set up you will see that the lead will run up the line with no resistance at all, infact if you snag the hook the swivel should just fall out of the lead.

i cast out this rig and then put the rod on the rests, holding the line in front of the reel to give some tension i then wind up till the line is nice and tight but not enough to move the lead, ending with the line coming off the bottom of the spool.

next clip on your bobbin, it shouldn't pull your line down at all, then slowly strip line off the reel till your bobbin is at half mast.

setting your bait runners on at this point shouldn't let any line off, if it does then just tighten up your free spool clutch (the back one) till it stops giving line.

finally just put your line in the clip and set your alarm on put kettle on and await results with baited (pun) breath :lol:

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I use running rigs with fully slack lines and still get fish. When I say slack I mean as in;

cast out on the clip till it hits bottom, unclip it. Move to wherever my rod rests are with the bail arm open. Hold the rod up as high and vertical as possible and let the line sink naturally. Keep opening the bail arm and letting more line out as it sinks until the line hangs limp from the rod tip when on the rest. Hold the line to the rod blank tight on the 'tip' side of alarm (not the reel side) clip the bobbin on. Pull line from the spool so the bobbin is hanging slack with no-minimal tension on the line. I use small bobbins too. Max 4g. The line then goes in the clip on the rod for a final bit of ooomph when a fish is hooked to drive the hook home.  clutch is set somewhat loose, not freespool loose. Make the fish work for the line, it stops them getting a head of steam up  

Id also like to say this probably only works because I have delkims. A roller wheel alarm does not suit the above method, you'd get no indication.

Edited by greekskii

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2 hours ago, cyborx said:

i personally use a lot of 1.5oz leads and they are set up so that the lead is completely free running.

my method is to put the lead and insert onto mainline then tie on a #8 swivel with a large ring, your hook link attaches to the large ring.

using this set up you will see that the lead will run up the line with no resistance at all, infact if you snag the hook the swivel should just fall out of the lead.

i cast out this rig and then put the rod on the rests, holding the line in front of the reel to give some tension i then wind up till the line is nice and tight but not enough to move the lead, ending with the line coming off the bottom of the spool.

next clip on your bobbin, it shouldn't pull your line down at all, then slowly strip line off the reel till your bobbin is at half mast.

setting your bait runners on at this point shouldn't let any line off, if it does then just tighten up your free spool clutch (the back one) till it stops giving line.

finally just put your line in the clip and set your alarm on put kettle on and await results with baited (pun) breath :lol:

My bobbins are hard to get half mast. Always seem to pull the line down too far. 

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I will fish "semi slack" due to having to use rig tubing. I don't want that up off the bottom :shock:  (Left hand rod had just had a slight drop back by the way!).....

 

26232766_10155420380916374_6031406258922531238_o.jpg

Edited by smufter

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I use running leads with slack lines as much as possible, although it is not possible if undertow or current becomes an issue.

 

The run rings I use are either Solar or Fox ones, and I do snip swivels off the leads.

 

To get the line lay right I cast out and gently tighten down to the lead to get the line sunk. I then put the rod tip under the water and pull line off the reel. This keeps the line below the surface. I then put the rod on the buzzer, and to make sure that the line is slack, and against every rod eye. I then attach my indicator at maximum drop. 

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