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Lumeymorris

Weight size for long rigs

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6 hours ago, B.C. said:

Do you recon these fish are less likely to bolt...… I can always imagine a wary fish, having been pricked by a hook, just sitting there thinking " how do I get myself out of this one"..... Maybe spinning vertically to rid the hook. I remember Nick talking about some fish slowly backing up so the rig will withdraw without being flipped into a prone position..... I'll be giving the lead free leaders a go as boom sections this week, spliced double, they are just shy of semi stiff. I'm hoping the extra weight will help hold the hook point in place for a second or two longer. and provoke a bolt reaction.

Yes I think they are excellent at getting away with it no matter what we do so for me the bigger the lead the less movement the fish can get away with before being pricked deep enough for it to have a problem.

I will use different shape leads as well going for a flat pear over casting leads if I can get the accuracy and distance with them and consider swapping from lead clip to drop-off inline.

As Yonny says if the lead plugs that's great adding to the weight, but on a hardish bottom a tournament casting type lead spins round too easily IMO giving the fish early warning that there is resistance present before the weight has the chance to come into effect - like 2-3 extra inches of movement, so I go for flat sided leads instead or squares or dumpy casting leads over tournaments, in the same way the swivel in the lead clip gives an extra inch of movement where inline doesn't.  Just my opinion of course.

Another note on riggy:

In the Nash In Pursuit videos fish sit rigged up all night when using the trigger link, and not just a one off, many times.

Also in a particular swim on Kingfisher I have had 5 takes in total from the same spot right on halfway, so isnt it surprising that all fish chose to charge towards me giving drop backs.  Firstly they are so riggy, then if they do get pricked they seem to know exactly what to do in a given swim, so interesting/frustrating.

 

 

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On ‎24‎/‎05‎/‎2018 at 11:00, kevtaylor said:

so I go for flat sided leads instead or squares or dumpy casting leads

Ditto.....

 

On ‎24‎/‎05‎/‎2018 at 11:00, kevtaylor said:

so interesting/frustrating.

 

Isn't that a beautiful thing....? lol

 

I've just nipped home to get some different bait.... Watched 3 largish fish circling over my single rod that I had out this morning (20's), they were dipping down now and then to pluck a bait up, waited 1hr before a stuttery take.... 6lb Tench, carp did the off...… Now that's frustrating 😃 lol...…… 2 Tench and a cat so far, but seen some decent fish showing so fingers crossed for next 24hrs.

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On 24 May 2018 at 11:00, kevtaylor said:

As Yonny says if the lead plugs that's great adding to the weight, but on a hardish bottom a tournament casting type lead spins round too easily IMO giving the fish early warning that there is resistance present before the weight has the chance to come into effect - like 2-3 extra inches of movement, so I go for flat sided leads instead or squares or dumpy casting leads over tournaments, in the same way the swivel in the lead clip gives an extra inch of movement where inline doesn't.  Just my opinion of course.

Aha!

You've picked up on something else, well actually two things at least. 

The flat pear or flattened dumpy does not spin on its axis like a standard,  pear or tournament lead, or even a round ball lead.

You can reduce freedom of movement on any lead by not having a swivel attached, but strangely leads with swivels attached sell better than those without. If I could buy leads without swivels I would, instead I have to cut the swivels off.

 

Another Rob Maylin observation or theory, he used round leads, the theory being that no matter which way the fish went, the total weight of the lead would hit home.

 

I mentioned in an earlier post, but failed to clarify. With running leads, and slack lines, I don't think rig length is as important as with semi-fixed leads, where the distance of movement to indication is critical, 'feeling' for the lead. With the (in my mind the still heavy) running lead, and slack line, the movement can be more, because the weight of the lead is 'unfelt', no matter how far the fish moves. Any movement past rig pulled tight is a bleep, as line has been taken through the run ring.  

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8 hours ago, salokcinnodrog said:

Aha!

You've picked up on something else, well actually two things at least. 

The flat pear or flattened dumpy does not spin on its axis like a standard,  pear or tournament lead, or even a round ball lead.

You can reduce freedom of movement on any lead by not having a swivel attached, but strangely leads with swivels attached sell better than those without. If I could buy leads without swivels I would, instead I have to cut the swivels off.

 

Another Rob Maylin observation or theory, he used round leads, the theory being that no matter which way the fish went, the total weight of the lead would hit home.

 

I mentioned in an earlier post, but failed to clarify. With running leads, and slack lines, I don't think rig length is as important as with semi-fixed leads, where the distance of movement to indication is critical, 'feeling' for the lead. With the (in my mind the still heavy) running lead, and slack line, the movement can be more, because the weight of the lead is 'unfelt', no matter how far the fish moves. Any movement past rig pulled tight is a bleep, as line has been taken through the run ring.  

I will look up the guy who does wicked swivel less leads and send you a link 😉

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On 24 May 2018 at 11:00, kevtaylor said:

As Yonny says if the lead plugs that's great adding to the weight, but on a hardish bottom a tournament casting type lead spins round too easily IMO giving the fish early warning that there is resistance present before the weight has the chance to come into effect - like 2-3 extra inches of movement, so I go for flat sided leads instead or squares or dumpy casting leads over tournaments, in the same way the swivel in the lead clip gives an extra inch of movement where inline doesn't.  Just my opinion of course.

Sorry Yonny, I started quoting Kev, and realised I should have included part of your post as well

 

Years ago, I spent ages flattening tournament leads to give me a flat sided lead, and having fun working out how to do the same with inline zipp leads. The answer was to put a slightly larger gauge copper wire than the hole inside, then use an anvil, vice and hammer.

Then someone came up with the idea of trilobe pendant leads, which were supposed to spread the weight on silt to slow them sinking in.

 

I actually think they worked best on gravel, sand and clay, where the lead sat flat on the lakebed. I wanted a lead to plug into silt in most cases!

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