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W00dy7

a Question about resevoirs

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Hi, relative noob here...

I want to go fishing at my local resevoir and have been looking at videos where people survey the bottom for various features i.e gravel beds, silt etc. my question is can this be done once and make a map of the bed or does it change dramatically?

 

Woody

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Hello Woody

I can't see that once you have your map the features you find would change that dramatically , that quickly .

Maybe if the reservoir is surrounded by trees which prevent a good airflow it might start to silt up over time ? .

😃

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17 hours ago, W00dy7 said:

my question is can this be done once and make a map of the bed or does it change dramatically?

It's lake dependant buddy, weed growth and location of weed-beds can change big time from year to year. That said, on a res you shouldn't see much variation. Crucian is right, reservoirs do tend to be silty as they're normally quite old and well established.

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On 14 April 2019 at 15:00, W00dy7 said:

Hi, relative noob here...

I want to go fishing at my local resevoir and have been looking at videos where people survey the bottom for various features i.e gravel beds, silt etc. my question is can this be done once and make a map of the bed or does it change dramatically?

 

Woody

Welcome to Carp.com.

 

Reservoirs come in various different types, from 'irrigation' reservoirs that farmers have, to blooming great damned valleys with massive depths. If you want to be pedantic, Redmire is or was a farm irrigation reservoir, that carp were stocked in to keep the weed down.

 

The underwater contours can change a great deal, and in a short space of time, or they can be gently sloping banks down to the depths.

Some reservoirs have inflow streams, others may have water piped in, or both.

You might find some fairly deep water close to the dam, I have fished two reservoirs locally, one goes to 45feet, the other is 60feet deep. That is the only common between the two.

One then has gently sloping banks into the water almost like a bowl on the two arms.

The other is very irregular shaped, going over 3 villages and drops down very quickly with a pronounced ledge.

 

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I fish large public reservoirs and find fish location more difficult than in shallower gravel pits and estate lakes. The main problem is the change in water level over the summer as water is extracted. My local lake can drop by 3 metres. This means there are no marginal plants to attract fish.

In the absence of any other information, I have a fool proof way of getting started. I take water depths at right angles to the bank and look for the point where a steep slope levels out. I used to use a marker float but, since they first became available, I have used a deeper. Do this at a few spots and get to know where the line of the bottom of the slope is. I usually cast out a marker float both sides of me so I know where to cast to and where to bait to. Also if you see a few bubbles it is easy to relate their location to that line.

I originally reasoned that any food would roll down the slope and accumulate at the bottom creating a hotspot. However a few mischucks of ground bait shows that it stays on the slope without rolling down. Perhaps feeding moves it or maybe water action does. Whatever the reason, that is my preferred starting point. One day, after a lot of pre-baiting I was excited to see a huge oval patch of bubbles heading along that break line towards my fishing spot. Unfortunately it turned out to be a shoal of bream but where bream go carp are sure to follow.

One word of caution. Fishing one spot regularly through a season, I developed the theory that the lower the water level, the less inclined the carp were to feed. Having located my spot, I marked and clipped up my line to ensure accurate distance. What my diminishing neurons failed to register was that, as the water level dropped, so the edge of the water moved away from the bank. So, for example, when the level had dropped 3 metres on a slope of say 1 in 3, I was actually casting 9 metres (30 feet in old money) past my hotspot.

Reservoirs can be daunting but very rewarding.

reservoir.jpg

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