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For those of you who do or have used tigers, do you find any times of the year better than others to use them and any tips on what to do or not do in terms of rig presentation, feeding or prebaiting with them etc. What works for you when using them. Cheers 

Edited by Uroy
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9 minutes ago, yonny said:

They'll work all year mate.

Don't use too many. They're best bulked out with something imo (hemp is a good option).

I tend to use them with boilie to avoid nuisance species. I don't do anything fancy when it comes to rigs. Keep it simple.

Your answer in a nutshell (pardon the pun) 

all I would add is to ensure they are well prepared correctly or use ready prepared nuts, use sparingly and use simple rigs that you already have confidence in. 

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On 10/03/2021 at 08:12, yonny said:

They'll work all year mate.

Don't use too many. They're best bulked out with something imo (hemp is a good option).

I tend to use them with boilie to avoid nuisance species. I don't do anything fancy when it comes to rigs. Keep it simple.

Why don’t you use too many mate? I take it they must fill the carp up more than a boilie?

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2 minutes ago, Its-grim-up-north said:

Why don’t you use to many mate? I take it they must fill the carp up more than a boilie?

Not really fill a carp up, it goes in one end, and straight through while continuing to eat. 

Tigers are also not particularly good for the carp, the only nutrition they can get from them is the surface, once they are eaten, either chewed, crunched or whole, swallowed, they come out exactly as they go in. Obviously most tigers are crunched and broken in the pharyngeal teeth. 

 

Tigers can be an addictive food, carp will eat almost nothing else if they are baited in large quantities, hence mixing up with hemp. 

For one litre tub of hemp, I have a handful of tigers in there. 

 

A single tiger on the hair, and a 5 tiger stringer works

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  • 1 month later...
On 11/03/2021 at 08:53, salokcinnodrog said:

Not really fill a carp up, it goes in one end, and straight through while continuing to eat. 

Tigers are also not particularly good for the carp, the only nutrition they can get from them is the surface, once they are eaten, either chewed, crunched or whole, swallowed, they come out exactly as they go in. Obviously most tigers are crunched and broken in the pharyngeal teeth. 

 

Tigers can be an addictive food, carp will eat almost nothing else if they are baited in large quantities, hence mixing up with hemp. 

For one litre tub of hemp, I have a handful of tigers in there. 

 

A single tiger on the hair, and a 5 tiger stringer works

it's definitely is wise to prepare your tigers properly and use sparingly, but my thoughts on their nutritional value is a little different to what others say, whilst they mostly come out of carp undigested this does not necessarily mean the carp get no value from them. I think tigers are mostly prebiotic fibre, which is an insoluble fibre, it doesn't provide anything in terms of direct nutrients, but it is food for the microbiome or gut bacteria, because it is food for them. So this may be why carp like them so much, but they are also full of sugars, and contain a lot of calcium, more than milk i think, carp seem to find calcium rich foods very attractive, and this is probably why it's good to put the egg shells in when making boilies.

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15 hours ago, jimmy_c said:

it's definitely is wise to prepare your tigers properly and use sparingly, but my thoughts on their nutritional value is a little different to what others say, whilst they mostly come out of carp undigested this does not necessarily mean the carp get no value from them. I think tigers are mostly prebiotic fibre, which is an insoluble fibre, it doesn't provide anything in terms of direct nutrients, but it is food for the microbiome or gut bacteria, because it is food for them. So this may be why carp like them so much, but they are also full of sugars, and contain a lot of calcium, more than milk i think, carp seem to find calcium rich foods very attractive, and this is probably why it's good to put the egg shells in when making boilies.

I have not used tiger nuts for bait yet - but I have eaten them myself!

There is a good amount of vegetable fat in tiger nuts, as well as the fibre most seem to think is the main point of eating them. They are a bit tough but can be chewed, the flavour reminds me of hazlenuts.

Lately I have blitzed a few hand fulls in a heavy duty blender to produce a flour. It's best to push the resulting coarse flour through a sieve and then blitz the rougher particles in the blender again, then the sieve a final time. Any larger particles left I chuck in my groundbait mix - nothing wasted!

My wife makes bread and adds about 15% tigernut flour to her wholemeal mix. The baked loaf has a better crust and the flavour is subtle, nutty and very slightly sweet.

Looks like we have a winner with this flour - tigernuts are tasty!

Edited by Pelamid
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3 hours ago, Pelamid said:

I have not used tiger nuts for bait yet - but I have eaten them myself!

There is a good amount of vegetable fat in tiger nuts, as well as the fibre most seem to think is the main point of eating them. They are a bit tough but can be chewed, the flavour reminds me of hazlenuts.

Lately I have blitzed a few hand fulls in a heavy duty blender to produce a flour. It's best to push the resulting coarse flour through a sieve and then blitz the rougher particles in the blender again, then the sieve a final time. Any larger particles left I chuck in my groundbait mix - nothing wasted!

My wife makes bread and adds about 15% tigernut flour to her wholemeal mix. The baked loaf has a better crust and the flavour is subtle, nutty and very slightly sweet.

Looks like we have a winner with this flour - tigernuts are tasty!

i've only made milk with them before, was very nice, nicer than cows milk imo, quite expensive though, that bread sounds delicious

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this article also says roasting or germinating tigers, increases the antioxidant levels, i think sprouted nuts, seeds and pulses can be a good edge for any bait, if your willing to do the extra prep, i've got some sprouted chick peas in the freezer i'm yet to use, but make sure you research prepare them properly, in some cases they can be dangerous.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 19/04/2021 at 12:46, Pelamid said:

I have not used tiger nuts for bait yet - but I have eaten them myself!

There is a good amount of vegetable fat in tiger nuts, as well as the fibre most seem to think is the main point of eating them. They are a bit tough but can be chewed, the flavour reminds me of hazlenuts.

Lately I have blitzed a few hand fulls in a heavy duty blender to produce a flour. It's best to push the resulting coarse flour through a sieve and then blitz the rougher particles in the blender again, then the sieve a final time. Any larger particles left I chuck in my groundbait mix - nothing wasted!

My wife makes bread and adds about 15% tigernut flour to her wholemeal mix. The baked loaf has a better crust and the flavour is subtle, nutty and very slightly sweet.

Looks like we have a winner with this flour - tigernuts are tasty!

Tigers go through the gut in humans, dogs and fish exactly as they were swallowed. 

If the tiger nut was crushed, chewed in the teeth, pieces come out. If they were swallowed whole, that is how they come out in the excrement. 

It may be fibre, but the actual legume itself is pretty much indigestible; hence why you do not want or need very many. 

In fact exactly the same as peanuts. 

The 'by-product' of tiger nut or peanut flour provides more useable nutrition. 

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4 hours ago, salokcinnodrog said:

Tigers go through the gut in humans, dogs and fish exactly as they were swallowed. 

If the tiger nut was crushed, chewed in the teeth, pieces come out. If they were swallowed whole, that is how they come out in the excrement. 

It may be fibre, but the actual legume itself is pretty much indigestible; hence why you do not want or need very many. 

In fact exactly the same as peanuts. 

The 'by-product' of tiger nut or peanut flour provides more useable nutrition. 

I think you could say the same of sweetcorn, as for tigers, because if you examine your stools after eating sweet corn, it's often often evident that corn is almost completely intact, yet it's universally accepted that sweetcorn is good for us. Also the fine flour or meal of tigers, may be coming out in a similar state it went in, but as the particles are finer, they're probably not as identifiable when they come out the other end, but if tiger nut flour is part of a boilie, alongside other ingredients used together they create a more valuable and complete food source, and are then suitable for consumption in larger quantities. So in the right amounts, i think insoluble plant fibres can be very good for both humans and fish, because your microbiome, (the colony of beneficial bacteria in your gut), feed on them, and with there being more bacteria organisms in the human gut, than there are people on the planet, the importance of the fibre that help maintain this colony of bacteria, which is something nutritional science is realising the importance of now more than ever, the same or similar is likely to be true of carp and many other animal species, though the exact species of bacteria in a fish's gut are probably slightly different to those in humans, but some or many of the strains will surely be similar to those found in humans imo. If as humans we were to eat nothing but the kind of fibre in tiger nuts though, then we would eventually become quite thin, and malnourished, so it is right to use tigers sparingly, or as part of a more complete boilie food source. This is also one of the reasons i think the unnatural vegan plant based diets being promoted at the moment aren't as healthy as some people think, but that's another story, In short in the right quantities fibre can be very healthy and an important part of both our, and the carp's diet, but as stated, i think fibre shouldn't be consumed in huge quantities all the time, i also think there will be times of year fibre is required more by the carp, like spring, because fibre also has detoxing qualities, that may help fish get rid of some of the parasites acquired through their winter torpor.

Edited by jimmy_c
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