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Guys I'm in need of a bit of advice.I caught a new pb the other night at around 11-12 at night and no one around the lake was up so couldn't go ask for help with photos so I sacked it(floating retainer) hoping I'll see someone up but no one got up so I had to do my self shots which didn't come out that great. So was wonder how long you could sack a carp because ideally I would of liked to wait untill first light but with the time of year carrying spawn I didn't want to take the risk but for future reference what would you guys recommend?? 

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Retainers are designed for short periods only-I’d say upto 45mins max depending on time of day, depth of water and temperature. Because they float the fish is restricted into the depth it needs to feel comfortable.

Night time, shallow weedy water in the height if summer is a recipe for disaster since the oxygen level will be at its lowest. I think there needs to be more education on this point.

My advice is to practice your self-takes and not risk the fish. Sacking through the night is an unnecessary risk.

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I have to agree with Pete on this one, I’m not a fan of sacking, I don’t own any sacks, I’ve a retainer sling that I will place the carp in for a few minutes after the fight so it can get its breath back and I can sort the camera equipment out. I much rather prefer to master self takes rather than retain carp for an extended length of time. Even with smart phones these days, self takes are possible. I use a little phone holder to hold it steady, then take a few practice shots so I can get my markers sorted, I look at the background of the practice shot so I know what to use, if a branch is at the top of the practice shot, then I make sure my head is not above that branch, or it will cut off my head in the photo, if that makes sense!! You can always edit the pics on phones afterward to adjust it to your liking. All these pics below are smart phone self takes, the hardest thing I find is trying not to pull a stupid face!  

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0F166F4E-68B5-4B66-82DA-0F7C990209F5.jpeg

8509DCD3-CA9C-4ED1-89F5-B6C13D426D8C.jpeg

E852FEE9-AD67-451F-80FE-AF49CAB13DFA.jpeg

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With a proper sack a carp can find the level it is happy to be at. A retainer type sticks the fish in the top foot of water. 
if you are going to retain a carp get a proper sack but as said 

no need to keep fish too long nowadays if you get the correct equipment to take a photo.

If you even need a photo.. 

 

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1461440251_23lboctobervirginiaotherside.thumb.JPG.4e7f3ab001ec021fc1eb7c4c9fdb2649.jpeg.c0fd3d1db7811c4539a9c7688b936d6c.jpeg

Getting decent night shots is all about the lighting tbh, I use a Canon dslr with an intervalometer makes it a doddle,96 led video light off amazon  just set it to take about 20 get the fish up pose, turn it take a few more one will turn out OK usually 👍

I will only put them in a retainer for a short while while I get everything sorted, I usually let it rest in the net for a couple of mins, unhooking in the water if I can, if not get my unhooking, weighing kit out, unhook it,treat it, put it in the retainer, weigh it and put it in the water while I sort out the camera and where I want to do the snap, take a practice shot, then once I am ready, take snaps, return the fish to fight another day, 

 

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Camera flash can be harsh and ruin photo's. Ouch's photo's are really good but the first common has blown out and the background been lost. Unfortunately a phone camera will never produce the same quality night shots as a camera. I always leave at least 6 foot between the camera and fish as it evens out the light a bit. Fishes scales act like mirrors under flash, commons more so than mirrors and you'll always give a bit of glare. If you angle the fish down slightly, it will reduce it. If your flash comes with a diffuser, use it as it scatters the light more and makes it more even. I have a built in flash on my bridge camera but soften it but placing some opaque film over it. Like Elmo, I've bought a 96 LED video light (less than £15) and that helps in setting up the shot and produces a more even light as I use it as an extra on a bank stick at 45 degrees to the fish.

The best thing to do is try some "dry" shots without a fish and play about with distance, flash output, diffusers and secondary lighting and see what suits your camera best and note the settings.

Flash photography isn't only for night photography. Anglers tend to dress in drab clothing (or camo!) and be in areas overcast by trees and bushes, fill in flash can really lift a shot. Next time you catch a fish in the day, take a few without flash and then some with, you'll be surprised that the flash shots will be often be better.

https://www.carpology.net/article/features/how-to-take-an-awesome-night-shot-/

Alex Kobler has done some really good articles on Carpology and well worth a read.

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56 minutes ago, Golden Paws said:

Camera flash can be harsh and ruin photo's. Ouch's photo's are really good but the first common has blown out and the background been lost. Unfortunately a phone camera will never produce the same quality night shots as a camera. I always leave at least 6 foot between the camera and fish as it evens out the light a bit. Fishes scales act like mirrors under flash, commons more so than mirrors and you'll always give a bit of glare. If you angle the fish down slightly, it will reduce it. If your flash comes with a diffuser, use it as it scatters the light more and makes it more even. I have a built in flash on my bridge camera but soften it but placing some opaque film over it. Like Elmo, I've bought a 96 LED video light (less than £15) and that helps in setting up the shot and produces a more even light as I use it as an extra on a bank stick at 45 degrees to the fish.

The best thing to do is try some "dry" shots without a fish and play about with distance, flash output, diffusers and secondary lighting and see what suits your camera best and note the settings.

Flash photography isn't only for night photography. Anglers tend to dress in drab clothing (or camo!) and be in areas overcast by trees and bushes, fill in flash can really lift a shot. Next time you catch a fish in the day, take a few without flash and then some with, you'll be surprised that the flash shots will be often be better.

https://www.carpology.net/article/features/how-to-take-an-awesome-night-shot-/

Alex Kobler has done some really good articles on Carpology and well worth a read.

Thanks mate, you’re right about the first pic, I used a head torch pointed at the fish to help me see, which did overdo it light wise somewhat! Some comprehensive information on photography there mate, nice one! 

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On 02/04/2021 at 13:22, Lumeymorris said:

Guys I'm in need of a bit of advice.I caught a new pb the other night at around 11-12 at night and no one around the lake was up so couldn't go ask for help with photos so I sacked it(floating retainer) hoping I'll see someone up but no one got up so I had to do my self shots which didn't come out that great. So was wonder how long you could sack a carp because ideally I would of liked to wait untill first light but with the time of year carrying spawn I didn't want to take the risk but for future reference what would you guys recommend?? 

Spawn already? 

Not yet😉

Carp won't be ready for spawning until the water has been 18 degrees for at least a week, probably late May, early June. 

As for sacking or retaining fish, just for a few minutes while you sort the camera gear out, an hour at the most if you have someone come and take pics. 

 

This fish was retained while I ran half a mile to get another angler to do the pics.

I can do my own self takes, but do prefer someone else to take pics as I think results are better. 

IMG_20200620_230035.jpg

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As above but obviously make sure you got a decent depth of water before retaining a fish... I had a big carp on the mat and had to hurry the pics then was no way I would keep her in the retaining sling, the swim had no depth to accommodate her and it was a hot day in the 30’s 🥵the head bailiff came along later and wasn’t to happy about not seeing the fish being returned safely. I told him the my reasons and he came around to my thinking. 

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I'd be too worried to sack a big carp just not doing it if you have the confidence it's up to the angler, but it could go real wrong fast.  chap on the lake behind me came and got me just before 6 am Thursday morning i was up, and more than happy to do a few pics.  I tend to sleep more during the day than at night when out.

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I don’t have a problem with someone coming to wake me if they have a carp need photographing, one lad woke me to take a pic of a low double then apologised afterwards as it was “only a little one” it happened to be the first carp he’s ever had from the lake, after a fair ole wait, so he was over the moon! That’s no drama as far as I’m concerned, I was happy to congratulate him and share the moment. 
 

I blanked... 🙄

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