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Boilie price drops, why?


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2 hours ago, elmoputney said:

I use a lot of pellet with my boilies, I tend to buy the biggest I can get as I think you get more bang for your buck, I am using 17mm ones now, not only are they great because you can just mix them with boilies and pult the lot out together but they don't break down for 48 hours meaning if you are prebaiting with them they wont just be mush by the time they find them,and they are nuisance resistant, but if you have a ridgemonkey boilie crusher, you can also crush pellets in it making a whole variety of bits which are ideal for bags etc, they are also good for taking on liquids, 

I've seen 18 and 22mm Halibut pellets take over a month to break down. The smaller ones do soften and break down faster, especially when they have been drilled. 

Don't know if you remember it, I put some pics up on here, some halibut pellets soured the bottom for months, nothing would come over them, not even the roach or perch, and they killed the bottom weed

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Chris uses pellets as a supplementary feed uses big 20 mm on the little lake, did ask why not use boilies as he once did, but he got moaned at for basically baiting up for you? he was using Nash baits so they must be ok and he was selling them, just does the pellet now sells a sack for £28, bag of pellets and a yellow pop up was hammering the middle lake last winter and spring. 

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1 hour ago, salokcinnodrog said:

I've seen 18 and 22mm Halibut pellets take over a month to break down. The smaller ones do soften and break down faster, especially when they have been drilled. 

Don't know if you remember it, I put some pics up on here, some halibut pellets soured the bottom for months, nothing would come over them, not even the roach or perch, and they killed the bottom weed

No I didn't see those nick tbh I doubt mine aren't being eaten as soon as they are soft enough the rudd would pull them apart if everything else has left them as there is so many of them in there, i use the Aller Aqua ones they seem pretty good tbh 

 

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I stopped using oiled pellets ages ago... I use coarse pellets as they break down quickly... That said, I've often found that pellets tend to make carp pre-occupied with them... especially micros and flavoured ones more so... I used softened 2mm and Goo-ed pellet in bags, the fish were tearing up the bottom to get every morsel of 2mm pellet, yet ignored the hookbaits...  now I use a matching hookbait and pellet glug and I get better results

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17 hours ago, bluelabel said:

I stopped using oiled pellets ages ago... I use coarse pellets as they break down quickly... That said, I've often found that pellets tend to make carp pre-occupied with them... especially micros and flavoured ones more so... I used softened 2mm and Goo-ed pellet in bags, the fish were tearing up the bottom to get every morsel of 2mm pellet, yet ignored the hookbaits...  now I use a matching hookbait and pellet glug and I get better results

In Tim Paisley's To Catch a Carp he mentions baiting up on Birch Grove with Micromass pellets, available at the time from Nash. The carp were ripping the bottom up long after the pellets had been eaten or dissolved. 

The smaller coarse pellets break down a lot faster than the larger more heavily oiled Salmon and Halibut pellets. 

Smaller food items can produce preoccupation to the state that the fish ignore everything else; hemp, pellets and some small seeds especially seem to produce that effect. 

I've seen carp picking up the hemp, ignoring tares that were in the same mix. 

Years ago, late 1980's/ early 1990's I tried baiting up with shelfies, Richworth Streamselect or the original Crafty Catcher. Only 2 flavours produced continued feeding, Salmon Supreme and King Prawn. Any other flavours, including Tutti Frutti, the fish would only pick a few up before leaving the area. 

From that I came to the conclusion (my own personal experience) that baiting heavily with attractor bait shelf life's was not worth the effort. Fish them with a stringer of freebies, but not bait up with them.

Yet bait up with a good decent food bait, fishmeal, meat meal (chicken, liver, beef) and the carp would continue to feed on them. 

The difference between the two was interesting to watch. The attractor bait was like a sweet or dessert, nice but you couldn't live on it, whereas the food bait you could survive long term. 

Even birdfood boilies did not produce long term feeding, they had a short term 'catching life', before they needed changing. Compare that to the fish or meat, which could catch for years. Milk proteins only worked long term with the addition of The Addits, bromelain and Bengers.

If they were not added the bait could not necessarily be digested very quickly, or the proteins were not useable. 

Of course, then came mixing bird foods with milk and fishmeal... 

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On 15/09/2021 at 09:42, salokcinnodrog said:

In Tim Paisley's To Catch a Carp he mentions baiting up on Birch Grove with Micromass pellets, available at the time from Nash. The carp were ripping the bottom up long after the pellets had been eaten or dissolved. 

The smaller coarse pellets break down a lot faster than the larger more heavily oiled Salmon and Halibut pellets. 

Smaller food items can produce preoccupation to the state that the fish ignore everything else; hemp, pellets and some small seeds especially seem to produce that effect. 

I've seen carp picking up the hemp, ignoring tares that were in the same mix. 

Years ago, late 1980's/ early 1990's I tried baiting up with shelfies, Richworth Streamselect or the original Crafty Catcher. Only 2 flavours produced continued feeding, Salmon Supreme and King Prawn. Any other flavours, including Tutti Frutti, the fish would only pick a few up before leaving the area. 

From that I came to the conclusion (my own personal experience) that baiting heavily with attractor bait shelf life's was not worth the effort. Fish them with a stringer of freebies, but not bait up with them.

Yet bait up with a good decent food bait, fishmeal, meat meal (chicken, liver, beef) and the carp would continue to feed on them. 

The difference between the two was interesting to watch. The attractor bait was like a sweet or dessert, nice but you couldn't live on it, whereas the food bait you could survive long term. 

Even birdfood boilies did not produce long term feeding, they had a short term 'catching life', before they needed changing. Compare that to the fish or meat, which could catch for years. Milk proteins only worked long term with the addition of The Addits, bromelain and Bengers.

If they were not added the bait could not necessarily be digested very quickly, or the proteins were not useable. 

Of course, then came mixing bird foods with milk and fishmeal... 

Noticed a bait just out called the fully loaded think it has all the above chucked in it, i don't like the companies sales tactics so i doubt i will use it plus i thought a seed base bait alone was so the fish could pass it through in cold weather at normal speed, where as a meat/fish bait would or could bung them up for a few days? 

 

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1 hour ago, Carpbell_ll said:

Noticed a bait just out called the fully loaded think it has all the above chucked in it, i don't like the companies sales tactics so i doubt i will use it plus i thought a seed base bait alone was so the fish could pass it through in cold weather at normal speed, where as a meat/fish bait would or could bung them up for a few days? 

 

I think digestion slows down in the winter rather than bungs them up, although in More from the Bivvy, one of the Rainbow chapters does mention fish full of boilies and how they were rolling to clear their systems, so I could be wrong. 

This is where bird food boilies with a better digestion rate could be the 'goto'. 

 

 

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23 hours ago, bluelabel said:

In winter their metabolic rate slows as does digestion... less movement means less food required... therefore less protiens and fats needed to maintain condition

Yet at the same time, if there is a continuing supply of food (not necessarily natural), with a decent supply of useable energy source, I.e carbohydrates as in bird food baits then they may continue to move around. 

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