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Mags got me thinking again.


levigsp
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thanks alot for that salokcinnodrog =]

 

all of that ties in with what i'm trying to achive with pre-baiting at the minute

 

so sorry but how do i tell what boillies are food sorce or high attrackt baits if its not so obvious

 

eg i'm pre baiting with mainline pulse what is that ?

 

thanks alot

i'm not really in the knowlage

 

 

its a forum mate, people are not going to answer each post before moving onto their own point, we would all have to be monitering the site permanently before we could ask or answer a question and post it.

Nick will no doubt get back to you in due course, in the meantime the thread keeps rolling

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

pulse is a reasonable bait, exactly same in make up as fusion but different levels of robin red. air dries well, rehydrate ok and taken a fair few fish but would advise to find a smaller baitfirm that can roll to your spec and recipe or if unsure go with one they produce already, or if it has to be a big firm....the only one that will ahppily list ingredients......nutrabaits

I've been out this evening, still trying to get my life in order, but failing dismally

Don't forget you also have a search facility :wink:

 

http://www.carp.com/carp-forum/viewtopic.php?t=31320&highlight=food+source+baits

 

That takes you to a list of some of the Food Source baits that are available. There are still more!

Don't forget with any Food Source Bait it has to be fished properly, that includes Pre-baiting to get the fish used to finding it. (again, hit the search facility on pre-baiting, Food Source baits vs Attractor baits and any permutation of bait you can think of), bet you will come up with a few more baits, and also how best to fish them.

 

chin up mate, can be in the gutter and still be looking at the stars :wink::wink::wink::wink::wink: Del

Ill second that,life has an uncany whey of kicking you when your down,but if you refuse to stay down,it also has the uncany knack of making things rosey :wink::wink:
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I thing carp do come up in the water! I fish in open matches and you sit there for 5 hours and as you look around you see the depth of other guys rigs (fishing on the bottom) not catching. I read in a recent mag that if you get the silver fish going for the food then the carp will come and investigate so I put this to the test for the past 3 weeks. I set up a rig for on the bottom and one at half depth for the roach 3 meters short of my carp line. After 2 hours the bottom rig had a few few fish but when the bites slowed down i tried the half depth rig. After about 2 put in's I had a nice roach then all went quiet again. I thought a carp might be around so I put on double corn just to see if they would take it at that depth as they do in summer, about 2 mins after I had put in the float went, I set the hook and was in to a carp. I kept catching on this method for about another hour or so. I had always been taught since I started fishing that winter carp always shoal up and hit the deck but after a session like that I'm not sure now! This was on a cold, wet day so the temp was down and had been over night!

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I thing carp do come up in the water! I fish in open matches and you sit there for 5 hours and as you look around you see the depth of other guys rigs (fishing on the bottom) not catching. I read in a recent mag that if you get the silver fish going for the food then the carp will come and investigate so I put this to the test for the past 3 weeks. I set up a rig for on the bottom and one at half depth for the roach 3 meters short of my carp line. After 2 hours the bottom rig had a few few fish but when the bites slowed down i tried the half depth rig. After about 2 put in's I had a nice roach then all went quiet again. I thought a carp might be around so I put on double corn just to see if they would take it at that depth as they do in summer, about 2 mins after I had put in the float went, I set the hook and was in to a carp. I kept catching on this method for about another hour or so. I had always been taught since I started fishing that winter carp always shoal up and hit the deck but after a session like that I'm not sure now! This was on a cold, wet day so the temp was down and had been over night!

They do shoal up,but everything I have seen,makes me beleave they hang up in the water,only going to the bottom for food.

The only fish I have seen on the deck in winter ,is the tench,even the eels Ive seen resting have been midwater in roots ect

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I thing carp do come up in the water! I fish in open matches and you sit there for 5 hours and as you look around you see the depth of other guys rigs (fishing on the bottom) not catching. I read in a recent mag that if you get the silver fish going for the food then the carp will come and investigate so I put this to the test for the past 3 weeks. I set up a rig for on the bottom and one at half depth for the roach 3 meters short of my carp line. After 2 hours the bottom rig had a few few fish but when the bites slowed down i tried the half depth rig. After about 2 put in's I had a nice roach then all went quiet again. I thought a carp might be around so I put on double corn just to see if they would take it at that depth as they do in summer, about 2 mins after I had put in the float went, I set the hook and was in to a carp. I kept catching on this method for about another hour or so. I had always been taught since I started fishing that winter carp always shoal up and hit the deck but after a session like that I'm not sure now! This was on a cold, wet day so the temp was down and had been over night!

They do shoal up,but everything I have seen,makes me beleave they hang up in the water,only going to the bottom for food.

The only fish I have seen on the deck in winter ,is the tench,even the eels Ive seen resting have been midwater in roots ect

 

got to agree there mate, very few try zigs at all on my water but they have produced and outfished my standard rigs in winter, but I do tend to fish them a little different by suspending them in the middle of the water column and also with a small bag attached to the lead that holds very small semi bouyant food items that will rise and fall in the column such as shavings of brazil nut etc :wink:

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I thing carp do come up in the water! I fish in open matches and you sit there for 5 hours and as you look around you see the depth of other guys rigs (fishing on the bottom) not catching. I read in a recent mag that if you get the silver fish going for the food then the carp will come and investigate so I put this to the test for the past 3 weeks. I set up a rig for on the bottom and one at half depth for the roach 3 meters short of my carp line. After 2 hours the bottom rig had a few few fish but when the bites slowed down i tried the half depth rig. After about 2 put in's I had a nice roach then all went quiet again. I thought a carp might be around so I put on double corn just to see if they would take it at that depth as they do in summer, about 2 mins after I had put in the float went, I set the hook and was in to a carp. I kept catching on this method for about another hour or so. I had always been taught since I started fishing that winter carp always shoal up and hit the deck but after a session like that I'm not sure now! This was on a cold, wet day so the temp was down and had been over night!

They do shoal up,but everything I have seen,makes me beleave they hang up in the water,only going to the bottom for food.

The only fish I have seen on the deck in winter ,is the tench,even the eels Ive seen resting have been midwater in roots ect

 

got to agree there mate, very few try zigs at all on my water but they have produced and outfished my standard rigs in winter, but I do tend to fish them a little different by suspending them in the middle of the water column and also with a small bag attached to the lead that holds very small semi bouyant food items that will rise and fall in the column such as shavings of brazil nut etc :wink:

Heres a Frank tip,you will not read this in a magazine,or book anywhere,and something that has stood me in good stead[or perhaps Im just lucky :wink::D ]

Mix a mug full of dry horlics with a equal amount of chalk,them mix with half a cup of bicarb.

Spoon this in bag,then soak the bag in oil,any oil its not for feed,sometimes Ill use three bags with oil coat on each,fasten to your lead whilst fishing a zig.

What happens is,slowly the water breaks the bag down,the oil slows this down,then the water reacts with the bicarb,sending a plume of bubbles up the water column,at the same time taking the other ingredients up with the bubbles.

When they reach the surface the same ingredients slowly sink,so you have an on going cloud effect.

The reason for the ingredients are.bicarb to react with the water,Horlics reacts with the bicarb to creat a massive food signal and no food,and the chalk,this is the complicated bit,and this is where some will find my thinking strange.

I have found on testing water all over the UK that in winter,especaly where the fish tend to congregate,that the water PH goes on the acid side of the scale :shock:therefore I have found that the acid water reacts with the chalk,which in turn reacts with the food signal ect ect

This is the reason I put calk in my winter boilies,when carp are examined for health tests by the EA ect,they find large ammounts of lime in them.

The chalk also adds wheight to the mix and slows its rise,and helps with its decent ect.

The oil slick on the surface also helps with the rise and fall.

I have found this helps me :D hope it may help you.

Hope this tip helps :D

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Heres a Frank tip,you will not read this in a magazine,or book anywhere,and something that has stood me in good stead[or perhaps Im just lucky :wink::D ]

Mix a mug full of dry horlics with a equal amount of chalk,them mix with half a cup of bicarb.

Spoon this in bag,then soak the bag in oil,any oil its not for feed,sometimes Ill use three bags with oil coat on each,fasten to your lead whilst fishing a zig.

What happens is,slowly the water breaks the bag down,the oil slows this down,then the water reacts with the bicarb,sending a plume of bubbles up the water column,at the same time taking the other ingredients up with the bubbles.

When they reach the surface the same ingredients slowly sink,so you have an on going cloud effect.

The reason for the ingredients are.bicarb to react with the water,Horlics reacts with the bicarb to creat a massive food signal and no food,and the chalk,this is the complicated bit,and this is where some will find my thinking strange.

I have found on testing water all over the UK that in winter,especaly where the fish tend to congregate,that the water PH goes on the acid side of the scale :shock:therefore I have found that the acid water reacts with the chalk,which in turn reacts with the food signal ect ect

This is the reason I put calk in my winter boilies,when carp are examined for health tests by the EA ect,they find large ammounts of lime in them.

The chalk also adds wheight to the mix and slows its rise,and helps with its decent ect.

The oil slick on the surface also helps with the rise and fall.

I have found this helps me :D hope it may help you.

Hope this tip helps :D

 

 

That's a new one on me. Cheers Frank :D

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  • 4 weeks later...

Just sent Mark Holmes an e-mail about the Curing Boilies in Salt Article.

 

Scary subject for you as a too much salt may cause health problems.

 

Dear Sir,

 

I am writing to you with some worry about an article you published recently about Curing Boilies in Salt.

 

I know that to compare Humans and Carp is totally irrelevant in most cases, but Salt in Humans in excess has been found to be detrimental to health. Surely this is likely to be the same for Carp.

 

I believe that the University of Chicago have done some research on Salt and Carp.

 

Although I have yet to find out the full research results this is something I have found out recently:

 

Salt exposure reduced food intake by 70% and had adverse effects on growth and survival. Although food consumption decreased and growth was seriously affected, routine oxygen consumption of the exposed fish did not drop, indicating a reallocation of energy expenditure from growth toward other processes. A stress-induced increase in plasma glucose was observed. As a result of low food intake, lower levels of protein were used for fuel. Protein use itself was probably replaced by the use of carbohydrates. These effects were confirmed by the depletion of both muscle and liver glycogen stores during the experimental period. We conclude that, besides the effects of reduced feeding, stress induced extra energy requirements leading to the depletion of energy stores.

 

 

This salt that the baits are cured in; Surely when a bait is stored in salt, any moisture is going to transfer salts into the centre of the bait increasing the salt content of the bait. Is this going to cause Health problems long or short term.

While I know that Research is available I feel that any article advocating this method of storing baits is NOT going to do the Carp's Health any good at all.

 

I look forward to your reply

 

Now to me it seems that too many articles are being published without enough research on possible dangers. That is from Rigs through to Baits as well.

 

Sorry even more reason for most mags to be boycotted

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Just sent Mark Holmes an e-mail about the Curing Boilies in Salt Article.

 

Scary subject for you as a too much salt may cause health problems.

 

Dear Sir,

 

I am writing to you with some worry about an article you published recently about Curing Boilies in Salt.

 

I know that to compare Humans and Carp is totally irrelevant in most cases, but Salt in Humans in excess has been found to be detrimental to health. Surely this is likely to be the same for Carp.

 

I believe that the University of Chicago have done some research on Salt and Carp.

 

Although I have yet to find out the full research results this is something I have found out recently:

 

Salt exposure reduced food intake by 70% and had adverse effects on growth and survival. Although food consumption decreased and growth was seriously affected, routine oxygen consumption of the exposed fish did not drop, indicating a reallocation of energy expenditure from growth toward other processes. A stress-induced increase in plasma glucose was observed. As a result of low food intake, lower levels of protein were used for fuel. Protein use itself was probably replaced by the use of carbohydrates. These effects were confirmed by the depletion of both muscle and liver glycogen stores during the experimental period. We conclude that, besides the effects of reduced feeding, stress induced extra energy requirements leading to the depletion of energy stores.

 

 

This salt that the baits are cured in; Surely when a bait is stored in salt, any moisture is going to transfer salts into the centre of the bait increasing the salt content of the bait. Is this going to cause Health problems long or short term.

While I know that Research is available I feel that any article advocating this method of storing baits is NOT going to do the Carp's Health any good at all.

 

I look forward to your reply

 

Now to me it seems that too many articles are being published without enough research on possible dangers. That is from Rigs through to Baits as well.

 

Sorry even more reason for most mags to be boycotted

 

I look forward to hearing his response

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Just sent Mark Holmes an e-mail about the Curing Boilies in Salt Article.

 

Scary subject for you as a too much salt may cause health problems.

 

Dear Sir,

 

I am writing to you with some worry about an article you published recently about Curing Boilies in Salt.

 

I know that to compare Humans and Carp is totally irrelevant in most cases, but Salt in Humans in excess has been found to be detrimental to health. Surely this is likely to be the same for Carp.

 

I believe that the University of Chicago have done some research on Salt and Carp.

 

Although I have yet to find out the full research results this is something I have found out recently:

 

Salt exposure reduced food intake by 70% and had adverse effects on growth and survival. Although food consumption decreased and growth was seriously affected, routine oxygen consumption of the exposed fish did not drop, indicating a reallocation of energy expenditure from growth toward other processes. A stress-induced increase in plasma glucose was observed. As a result of low food intake, lower levels of protein were used for fuel. Protein use itself was probably replaced by the use of carbohydrates. These effects were confirmed by the depletion of both muscle and liver glycogen stores during the experimental period. We conclude that, besides the effects of reduced feeding, stress induced extra energy requirements leading to the depletion of energy stores.

 

 

This salt that the baits are cured in; Surely when a bait is stored in salt, any moisture is going to transfer salts into the centre of the bait increasing the salt content of the bait. Is this going to cause Health problems long or short term.

While I know that Research is available I feel that any article advocating this method of storing baits is NOT going to do the Carp's Health any good at all.

 

I look forward to your reply

 

Now to me it seems that too many articles are being published without enough research on possible dangers. That is from Rigs through to Baits as well.

 

Sorry even more reason for most mags to be boycotted

 

I look forward to hearing his response

 

Thats if you get one :roll:

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  • 5 years later...
Sorry for dragging up an old thread, I stumbled across this video from the 5 lakes show where Mark advertised the use of salt pre-spawning.

 

 

Did you get an email back? Doesn't sound like he took much notice.

He has receaved some serious stick and various corispondance since the vidio came out, two forums have long threads about it.

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Just been reading through this thread and have to agree with a lot of things said by others,i'm just getting back into carping after a long lay off(over 20 years) :? and i have to say what magazines i have seen mostly rehash and go over the same thing over and over(do we REALLY need to be told how to mix attractive ingredients for spod/stick mixes?) time and time again,i'd like to think not!.When i was into this game in a big way back in the day i read the magazines and as a previous poster said the writers then did seem to be less interested in pushing products,although i'm not naive enough to think some weren't.

If i had to give my opinion i would say as others have,keep it simple get confidence in things and you won't go far wrong.

 

 

The second thing that did interest me was this salt issue,so i did a bit of reading on the subject and will leave a quote i found and also a link to further reading if anybody is interested,the link is heavy reading but there are some pertinent points that can be picked out.

 

Stenohaline common carp (Cyprinus carpio) were chronically exposed to the two main osmoregulatory ions, Na+ and Cl-, at levels close to their isoosmotic value for 28 d (171 mM NaCl; 324 mosm kg-1; 10 per thousand). The aim of this study was to assess whether or not the disturbed ion and osmoregulation affected the energy demand and the energy stores of the exposed fish. Salt exposure reduced food intake by 70% and had adverse effects on growth and survival. Although food consumption decreased and growth was seriously affected, routine oxygen consumption of the exposed fish did not drop, indicating a reallocation of energy expenditure from growth toward other processes. A stress-induced increase in plasma glucose was observed. As a result of low food intake, lower levels of protein were used for fuel. Protein use itself was probably replaced by the use of carbohydrates. These effects were confirmed by the depletion of both muscle and liver glycogen stores during the experimental period. We conclude that, besides the effects of reduced feeding, stress induced extra energy requirements leading to the depletion of energy stores.

 

 

The Link:http://jeb.biologists.org/content/199/7/1605.full.pdf

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