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Carp care kits ect.

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It's been mentioned about the cost of products involed in Carp care.

Come on, does that really matter? As long as the correct care and treatment is given to the fish, surely that's all that counts.

Yes it does matter.

There are people going fishing that are on there knuckle bones when it comes to money.

I met someone this summer who was and is still pennyless,he goes fishing to take his mind of his problems :wink:

He is not alone,when made bankrupt,the tackle is not normaly taken :wink:

So every penny that can be saved by these people or kids is a bonus.

When it comes to carp care the tackle manafactures should put there gear out at realistic prices.

 

Yes but some people might use a cheap product which, although they think might be doing the fish good, could in fact be doing the opposite.

I agree that the manufactures should be more realistic with prices but they know there's a demand for their products so they will try and get the best price.

I just think that with all the money we spend on fishing, rods, reels, tackle, bait, etc. and the cost of actually going fishing that the cost of Carp care is minimal in comparison.

In the normal run of things I would agree.

However there are anglers out there on a realy tight buget,that being the case they are more likely to use something if it costs pence, then they are if its pounds.

At the end of the day any form of liquid iodine if perfect for hook holds.

For scin cuts split fins etc you need something in cream or spray gel form.

There are countless products on the market suitable.

 

What's normal in this day and age....lol?

I think most of us at some time, and even now, are on a tight budget, I know I am, so yes, if money can be saved, fair enough, as long as whatever is used to treat wounds, hook holds, etc. on the fish we catch is safe and not harming the fish.

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Just for the record carpingod, it is actually one word, not Angler Shaven. LOL

 

Thought so... Wish I could change my username aswell TBH :oops: :oops: :lol:

why dont ya then? change your usename then put a thread up letting everyone know.

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Just for the record carpingod, it is actually one word, not Angler Shaven. LOL

 

Thought so... Wish I could change my username aswell TBH :oops: :oops: :lol:

why dont ya then? change your usename then put a thread up letting everyone know.

 

I think only MODs can TBH... And I wouldn't trust them to! :shock::lol::lol:

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Just for the record carpingod, it is actually one word, not Angler Shaven. LOL

 

Thought so... Wish I could change my username aswell TBH :oops: :oops: :lol:

why dont ya then? change your usename then put a thread up letting everyone know.

 

I think only MODs can TBH... And I wouldn't trust them to! :shock::lol::lol:

:lol: dont blame ya, could you imagine what you would be given by them.

as for carp care, it is a must but i do agree the money these company's charge is out of order tbh, saying that if your like me it will last for years cause it never gets used :lol:

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Gentlemen

 

I have been reading the thread on unhooking mats with great interest. However, I would like to hear your views on carp care first aid kits ect such as Klin-ik and Medicarp ultra ect. :idea: I would like to see the large tackle companies sell these products at COST to encourage there widespread use. I find it quite alarming the amount of anglers that dont use these products :evil: and I can only think that it is price that is discouaging them. What do you think :?:

 

I think that there are a couple of extremely Long Threads on the subject of Fish Care already :wink: and I will posts the links, covering the question of Hookhold treatments, Unhooking Mats, etc

http://www.carp.com/carp-forum/viewtopic.php?t=23920&highlight=iosal

 

http://www.carp.com/carp-forum/viewtopic.php?t=21839&highlight=bonjella

 

http://www.carp.com/carp-forum/viewtopic.php?t=32831&highlight=iosal

 

These may actually answer some of your question , and may save repeat posting :wink:

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Gentlemen

Thanks for your comments on the subject and I make no apologies for bringing up the subject again. I know that most anglers do not use carp care products and that is why I would like to see these products sold at 'COST' to encourage there use. It is also interesting to see that we all know quite alot about our 'Chod' rigs ect, :oops: , but little about carp care. Sad but true.

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Gentlemen

Thanks for your comments on the subject and I make no apologies for bringing up the subject again. I know that most anglers do not use carp care products and that is why I would like to see these products sold at 'COST' to encourage there use. It is also interesting to see that we all know quite alot about our 'Chod' rigs ect, :oops: , but little about carp care. Sad but true.

 

On a subject as Important as Fish Care I don't care if it does get brought up again, it is that important, or it SHOULD be :!::!::wink:

 

In fact I will put this into the Sticky section so it doesn't keep slipping down the page

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I can't remember who asked about it, but on this thread is the accidental answer as to partly how long fish can be kept out the water for:

http://www.carp.com/carp-forum/viewtopic.php?t=19466&highlight=unfished+lake

 

 

 

No matter what, any fish that is captured should be put back in the water as quickly as possible.

 

Photos should be forgotten if the fish shows any sign of distress.

 

A large Mat, I normally have a wet sack covering mine, and also the weigh sling on top of that open, so I can unhook the fish, lift and move the net out the way, and then straight into the weigh sling. The photos often come before the weighhing, so just after I have weighed the fish I can return it to the water in the sling as it is easier and safer to carry. If I have had done the photos after the weighing for whatever reason, then I lay the fish on the mat, and I'll slide the mat back to the water to let the fish go.

 

I'm normally happy enough getting photos done in the dark as I don't like sacking fish.

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When it comes to other external wounds (ie not mouth damage from hooks), you know like open cuts and sores- would germaline be good to apply to the wound???

 

I was thinking of getting a tube of bonjela and a little tin of germaline rather that getting the clinic- as it will be a while before i can get to a farm shop to buy a suitable- simple iodine product :?

 

I didn't know which thread to post on after reading through some of the links that nick provided?

 

Thanks for any replies :)

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Gentlemen

Thanks for your comments on the subject and I make no apologies for bringing up the subject again. I know that most anglers do not use carp care products and that is why I would like to see these products sold at 'COST' to encourage there use. It is also interesting to see that we all know quite alot about our 'Chod' rigs ect, :oops: , but little about carp care. Sad but true.

 

Great idea, but what business in their right mind is going to sell something at cost. Business is about making profit, and unfortunately there is none selling at cost.

 

I do agree with you in principle, but you might have to find another way to ensure that people start using it.

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Thanks mate :)

Thats a good price compared with the korda one, Is that what you use then Nick???? tbf i thort when people mentioned "klinic" it was the Korda one at like £12-13 :?

And has no one tried germolene then?????? :?

I dont realy like buying off ebay- i prefer the phone or see it in person :oops:

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Gentlemen

Thanks for your comments on the subject and I make no apologies for bringing up the subject again. I know that most anglers do not use carp care products and that is why I would like to see these products sold at 'COST' to encourage there use. It is also interesting to see that we all know quite alot about our 'Chod' rigs ect, :oops: , but little about carp care. Sad but true.

 

Great idea, but what business in their right mind is going to sell something at cost. Business is about making profit, and unfortunately there is none selling at cost.

 

I do agree with you in principle, but you might have to find another way to ensure that people start using it.

when people mentioned "klinic" it was the Korda one at like £12-13 :?

There was a thread about (probably one of those links) asking about Germolene, Sudacrem, Bonjella etc

 

 

The worry I have about Korda is the making of a profit rather than the care for the fish unless they have explained themselves somewhere.

 

 

Dave Chilton refused to put Klinik at a profit or kept the price the same so that people would use it :wink:

I have a full report here that he did for someone:

Why Klin-ik?

By Dave Chilton

 

Dave Chilton of Kryston tells us why and how the totally safe and laboratory formulated fish care product Klin-ik was introduced.

 

Klin-ik, a Laboratory Formulated Fish Care Product

Recently there has been a spate of discussions about fish care regarding Bonjella and other medications. Regardless of who is right or wrong all the posters deserve a pat on the back because it proves that anglers do really care. Before I cut to the chase it is important that you understand the reason why we introduced our fish care product that was also referenced in the posts, to the marketplace.

 

 

 

As little as twenty years ago well meaning anglers literally used to play with fire in order to help the fish. There were not many products commercially available to treat fish other than a few very old fashioned remedies as were used in the trenches in WW1 as a cure-all. The medics used them because they had nothing else, it was kill or cure.

 

Two of these products, which I believe date back at least to the 19th century, were Gentian Violet and Malachite Green. (Both of these products come under the category of aniline dyes that are highly toxic to tissue and in their concentrated state have known carcinogenic links!) Hence the reason why the skull and crossbones logo appears on the packaging.

 

For MG the minimum recommended dosage dilution ratio is 2mls per 100 litres of water. One manufacturer recommends 1mm per 80 litres of water! As you can see the product is extremely highly concentrated which is why contact with skin should be avoided.

 

In the past MG has been used for all manner of things water wise, dying wools and synthetics, de-scaling stew ponds in an effort to kill harmful bacteria, kill weed and probably everything that lived in it, plus a whole host of heavy-duty aquatic maintenance jobs. Like DDT which is now banned worldwide, it was used back then simply because there was little knowledge and very few options, basically nothing else, and you could make gallons of the stuff for next to nowt.

 

As a kid I remember the council flushing bright coloured liquid down the drains, my mum asked, “Will it kill the smell?” “It'll kill everything luv, rats as well!” came the reply.

 

To treat a poorly fish the subject had to be quarantined in a tank and the diluted liquid was applied to the water on days 1, 3, 5 and 7. Therefore a 50-litre tank requires 1 ml.

 

Moving back in time when Walker and pals led the great masses to specimen hunting…yeah I know you're all called “specialists” now, but they were hunters then wearing big daft hats. As the mad hatter population grew, so did thoughts of fish welfare. Gone was the gaff and knotted nets were fast disappearing, fish conservation became all-important. A few anglers even used to treat the fish.

 

Our well-meaning hero used to wet his finger, dab it in the neat toxic powder or concentrated liquid and rub it directly onto the damaged area of the fish! Feeling proud of helping his quarry he then celebrated by picking up a cheese butty and using the same fingers consumed it with great relish!

 

He didn't attempt to wash the vivid day-glo green or violet from his fingers because past experience taught him he couldn't. The stuff remains on for day's, even weeks! Later making his way home after a good days fishing, possibly with a warm inner glow, looking forward to a hearty meal and maybe thinking what the wife would be wearing… (We won't go down that road, especially with those hands)!

 

All manner of potions were practiced by some of the guru's high priest and witchdoctors on the bank. Bleach, mustard powder, vinegar, linseed oil, ointments, as well as some dubious industrial products, which were harmful to the fish and also to them. I fished with a guy who worked for the parks department and if you caught a fish in less than pristine condition he was like a man possessed and would be onto it in a flash. Out would come the bottle and the missing scale of the four-ounce Roach was treated. Albert had greener fingers than Percy Thrower.

 

On a small syndicate water in recent years a number of fish caught appeared to have mysterious visible burn marks on their body. It's similar to a milky virus patch as found on tropical marine fish when you introduce them to a tank and you have not balanced the saline content and water temperature correctly. This was a puzzle, it had never happened previously and the majority of the fish were in stunning condition.

 

The case was solved when a new member was spotted rubbing his “home cure” onto the fish. It must have been better than Fiery Jack and probably killed 99% of household germs as well. Any solution, which causes burn or blemishes on fish, should be seriously questioned. The angler was quickly admonished without sentence but genuinely pleaded he thought he was helping the fish, cos he read it in an old angling book. (The Compleat Angler?).

 

The watchwords are, if in doubt don't use it, simple. You may laugh but this situation is still going on to this day, and remaining unchecked could lead to unnecessary problems. In short this is one of the main reasons why we introduced our fish care product to the marketplace.

 

what is Klin-ik?

 

It is a totally safe, approved laboratory formulated anti-bacterial treatment suitable for all coarse fish.

 

“What's in it?”

 

Hmmmmm! And…. Err, it's got a Green colour to it!

 

I'm not telling you, but within the solution you will find ingredients which are found in an operating theatre, a dentist and a vets. A team of specialists in their fields, following lengthy consultation with MAFF, eventually arrived at the formulation. 50% of the contents are produced from natural ingredients and it contains the most powerful anti-viral agent known to man. It also contains anti-bacterial, fungal and parasitized agents.

 

A great deal of time research and effort went into the making of the formula with the directive that it be “totally safe to both to man and fish”.

 

Therefore, I don't think it would be a wise move to reveal it, do you?

 

“What does it do?”

 

When we remove a hook we leave behind a puncture hole. In certain cases that open cavity could lead to secondary infection setting in. The treatment is purposely designed to be an extremely searching liquid that immediately seeps and travels in a capillary action down to the base of the wound instantly cleansing and sterilizing the immediate area. The medication is rapidly absorbed into the blood cells and this is where the other ingredients kick in, speeding up the healing process and helping the regeneration of tissue. Thus giving the fish a flying start on the road to recovery.

 

This applies to hook holds, spawning lesions, recent missing scales, torn fins, etc. The treatment is not as effective on older wounds, which have partially healed.

 

“Would you then use a sealant or gel?”

 

I would never use a gel or ointment. If I use a gel following hook removal I am sealing in the wound. Unless the hook was sterilized, which they cannot be after lying in silt or decaying matter, the puncture could already be harbouring harmful micro-organisms or any micro parasitic nasty leading to infection. The last thing I want is to lock in anything that could cause harm especially in an environment that has not been thoroughly cleaned.

 

 

 

Always apply Klin-ik with the cotton buds supplied to ensure excess fluid goes only on the wound

 

Once the area has been totally sterilized it should be left open allowing the water to circulate and reach the base of the cavity. The fish is then allowed to recover under its own natural healing process. When you grazed yourself as a kid your mother cleansed it and left it open to let the air get to it to make it scab up quickly. Cut your finger and put on an Elastoplast, keep it on for five days and the cut remains open, it requires air to heal. Fish live in water; they are the opposite of us. If I believed a gel would aid the fish any better than Klin-ik then we would sell a gel.

 

If it really does make your conscience feel better then use a gel but make sure that you have sterilized the area before hand with a safe searching antiseptic.

 

For cuts to ourselves we are told thoroughly clean the wound and then use a proprietary cream and if required a light breathable dressing. How can you thoroughly clean a puncture hole without a searching antiseptic? Gels and ointments will not penetrate down to the base of the wound such as a puncture. Some gels do nothing more than numb the tissue for a short period of time. Gels cement the wound preventing water from reaching surface and internal areas, which require healing. Regeneration of missing scales start by scabbing over, the scab or soft tissue is the birth of a new scale, which requires water to flourish without anything impeding the growth.

 

“I have noticed the odd fish flinch when I have applied the solution. Why?”

 

That is the signal that the solution has penetrated to the base of the wound, it only takes a second and then the fish calms down. Its similar to a cut finger, apply Dettol or TCP and it instantly stings as it sterilizes, but there is a lot more in Klin-Ik than just antiseptic. It contains an anti-parasiticide to ward off parasites that feast and breed on newly exposed tissue.

 

Two years ago I landed a Ribble chub that was in very poor condition. The creature was heavily infested with argulus, there must have been 30 or so feasting off its flanks. They leave behind a tunnel as they burrow through the upper layer of tissue. A drop of solution was placed at the tunnel entrance and rapidly seeped through. Boy, do those critters scuttle, and they don't like it.

 

Anglers say the treatment washes off after a period, that's why they use gels.

 

They think it does but that is only the visible carrier that washes off. Because it is water based product the essential ingredients are delivered immediately and absorbed into the cells/bloodstream. In the few seconds it takes to apply it will totally cleanse and sterilize the immediate area. There is no long or short-term advantage for the solution to remain on the fish, the job has been done within a split second and the fish's natural healing process will now get underway. Once it's sterilized it's sterilized, period!

 

It has been said that most fish will recover under their own natural healing process without medication.

 

That is perfectly true but what about the odd fish, the one in a hundred, the one in a thousand even. That particular fish could have the potential to reach a record-breaking size, it could be the fish of a lifetime. Some of you may be nodding your head saying yeah, but that's not the point; if that fish only grew to a maximum of 5lbs it still deserves a chance.

 

We don't know which particular fish will recover, nobody does, so why not treat every fish? All it takes is a couple of drops and it's nice to put something back into angling. In over 50 years of angling I have seen some sorry sights, horrendous growths not only around the mouth area but also body and fin infections. Science has come a long way since those early days so for the sake of a couple of drops or a quick wipe with a cotton bud why risk potentially unnecessary trauma, especially with potions from the dark ages?

 

“How long will a bottle of solution last and what is its shelf life?”

 

In one bottle there is enough medication to treat hundreds of fish, I have seen well meaning anglers literally swamping and almost bathing the fish in the solution. There is no need. All they are doing is wasting the product. The fish will come to no harm using excessive application, but in areas where scales and surface tissue remain undamaged and intact there is no requirement for treatment of any sort.

 

Shelf life is dependent on storage. As long as it is kept in cool conditions, fridge, garage floor, etc, it should remain effective for at least a couple of years.

 

Finally “Is there anything dangerous or harmful in it and why the green colour?”

 

The product is totally safe and environmentally friendly. Only a few weeks ago a very worried angler phoned me saying his toddler had just drank about a third of the bottle. Obviously being a concerned parent he was nearing a state of stress. We immediately assured him there would be no ill effects and instructed him to get his child to drink water, as in many cases this is normal practice. We then faxed his local hospital with a (C.O.S.H.H.) statement, which identifies the ingredients. The doctors assured him there was no undue cause for alarm. The only damage done was to leave a nasty taste in the mouth. Bet his little bread snatcher did not come back for seconds.

 

The greenish colour comes from our updated version, which contains the powerful anti-viral agent, which is all-important. One of our customers is the Environment Agency who buy it and issue it to their bailiffs to treat fish on public and private waters when on license checking duty. They also use it for obvious reasons to heal damaged and torn fins, lesions, etc, when netting is taken place. We also sell it to koi importers who often treat damaged fish especially following transportation from overseas.

 

There are no aniline dyes contained in the solution, there is not a single trace of malachite green or gentian violet in Klin-ik.

 

Regardless of market forces and the ever-changing pharmaceutical directives coming from Brussels we purposely keep down the price of the solution. The low price (which it is, if you knew the cost involved) of the product has been maintained over a ten-year period. That's my way of putting something back in the sport that has given me so much pleasure. We sell tens of thousands of bottles each year world wide without advertising; therefore we do not have to promote the product.

 

Me personally I had a bottle of Io-Sal that I got from a local Koi dealer, and I always have Klinik in the Tackle box.

 

I don't suppose Klinik can really be played about with by dodgy dealers.

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Whatever treatment you use guys, always avoid eyes and gills, im an experienced koi keeper and use a product sold at koi outlets, made by NTLABS its called wound seal and does that!! seals for 3-7 days and allows anticeptic treatment to work. :wink:

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Kryston - Klinik

Kryston Klin-ik is a totally safe laboratory formulated antiseptic for all coarse fish.

It speeds up the natural healing process and one shot will immediately sterilize the area of the hook hold.

Each bottle will treat over 300 fish.

 

Why Klin-ik?

By Dave Chilton

 

Dave Chilton of Kryston tells us why and how the totally safe and laboratory formulated fish care product Klin-ik was introduced.

 

Klin-ik, a Laboratory Formulated Fish Care Product

Recently there has been a spate of discussions about fish care regarding Bonjella and other medications. Regardless of who is right or wrong all the posters deserve a pat on the back because it proves that anglers do really care. Before I cut to the chase it is important that you understand the reason why we introduced our fish care product that was also referenced in the posts, to the marketplace.

 

 

 

As little as twenty years ago well meaning anglers literally used to play with fire in order to help the fish. There were not many products commercially available to treat fish other than a few very old fashioned remedies as were used in the trenches in WW1 as a cure-all. The medics used them because they had nothing else, it was kill or cure.

 

Two of these products, which I believe date back at least to the 19th century, were Gentian Violet and Malachite Green. (Both of these products come under the category of aniline dyes that are highly toxic to tissue and in their concentrated state have known carcinogenic links!) Hence the reason why the skull and crossbones logo appears on the packaging.

 

For MG the minimum recommended dosage dilution ratio is 2mls per 100 litres of water. One manufacturer recommends 1mm per 80 litres of water! As you can see the product is extremely highly concentrated which is why contact with skin should be avoided.

 

In the past MG has been used for all manner of things water wise, dying wools and synthetics, de-scaling stew ponds in an effort to kill harmful bacteria, kill weed and probably everything that lived in it, plus a whole host of heavy-duty aquatic maintenance jobs. Like DDT which is now banned worldwide, it was used back then simply because there was little knowledge and very few options, basically nothing else, and you could make gallons of the stuff for next to nowt.

 

As a kid I remember the council flushing bright coloured liquid down the drains, my mum asked, “Will it kill the smell?” “It'll kill everything luv, rats as well!” came the reply.

 

To treat a poorly fish the subject had to be quarantined in a tank and the diluted liquid was applied to the water on days 1, 3, 5 and 7. Therefore a 50-litre tank requires 1 ml.

 

Moving back in time when Walker and pals led the great masses to specimen hunting…yeah I know you're all called “specialists” now, but they were hunters then wearing big daft hats. As the mad hatter population grew, so did thoughts of fish welfare. Gone was the gaff and knotted nets were fast disappearing, fish conservation became all-important. A few anglers even used to treat the fish.

 

Our well-meaning hero used to wet his finger, dab it in the neat toxic powder or concentrated liquid and rub it directly onto the damaged area of the fish! Feeling proud of helping his quarry he then celebrated by picking up a cheese butty and using the same fingers consumed it with great relish!

 

He didn't attempt to wash the vivid day-glo green or violet from his fingers because past experience taught him he couldn't. The stuff remains on for day's, even weeks! Later making his way home after a good days fishing, possibly with a warm inner glow, looking forward to a hearty meal and maybe thinking what the wife would be wearing… (We won't go down that road, especially with those hands)!

 

All manner of potions were practiced by some of the guru's high priest and witchdoctors on the bank. Bleach, mustard powder, vinegar, linseed oil, ointments, as well as some dubious industrial products, which were harmful to the fish and also to them. I fished with a guy who worked for the parks department and if you caught a fish in less than pristine condition he was like a man possessed and would be onto it in a flash. Out would come the bottle and the missing scale of the four-ounce Roach was treated. Albert had greener fingers than Percy Thrower.

 

On a small syndicate water in recent years a number of fish caught appeared to have mysterious visible burn marks on their body. It's similar to a milky virus patch as found on tropical marine fish when you introduce them to a tank and you have not balanced the saline content and water temperature correctly. This was a puzzle, it had never happened previously and the majority of the fish were in stunning condition.

 

The case was solved when a new member was spotted rubbing his “home cure” onto the fish. It must have been better than Fiery Jack and probably killed 99% of household germs as well. Any solution, which causes burn or blemishes on fish, should be seriously questioned. The angler was quickly admonished without sentence but genuinely pleaded he thought he was helping the fish, cos he read it in an old angling book. (The Compleat Angler?).

 

The watchwords are, if in doubt don't use it, simple. You may laugh but this situation is still going on to this day, and remaining unchecked could lead to unnecessary problems. In short this is one of the main reasons why we introduced our fish care product to the marketplace.

 

what is Klin-ik?

 

It is a totally safe, approved laboratory formulated anti-bacterial treatment suitable for all coarse fish.

 

“What's in it?”

 

Hmmmmm! And…. Err, it's got a Green colour to it!

 

I'm not telling you, but within the solution you will find ingredients which are found in an operating theatre, a dentist and a vets. A team of specialists in their fields, following lengthy consultation with MAFF, eventually arrived at the formulation. 50% of the contents are produced from natural ingredients and it contains the most powerful anti-viral agent known to man. It also contains anti-bacterial, fungal and parasitized agents.

 

A great deal of time research and effort went into the making of the formula with the directive that it be “totally safe to both to man and fish”.

 

Therefore, I don't think it would be a wise move to reveal it, do you?

 

“What does it do?”

 

When we remove a hook we leave behind a puncture hole. In certain cases that open cavity could lead to secondary infection setting in. The treatment is purposely designed to be an extremely searching liquid that immediately seeps and travels in a capillary action down to the base of the wound instantly cleansing and sterilizing the immediate area. The medication is rapidly absorbed into the blood cells and this is where the other ingredients kick in, speeding up the healing process and helping the regeneration of tissue. Thus giving the fish a flying start on the road to recovery.

 

This applies to hook holds, spawning lesions, recent missing scales, torn fins, etc. The treatment is not as effective on older wounds, which have partially healed.

 

“Would you then use a sealant or gel?”

 

I would never use a gel or ointment. If I use a gel following hook removal I am sealing in the wound. Unless the hook was sterilized, which they cannot be after lying in silt or decaying matter, the puncture could already be harbouring harmful micro-organisms or any micro parasitic nasty leading to infection. The last thing I want is to lock in anything that could cause harm especially in an environment that has not been thoroughly cleaned.

 

 

 

Always apply Klin-ik with the cotton buds supplied to ensure excess fluid goes only on the wound

 

Once the area has been totally sterilized it should be left open allowing the water to circulate and reach the base of the cavity. The fish is then allowed to recover under its own natural healing process. When you grazed yourself as a kid your mother cleansed it and left it open to let the air get to it to make it scab up quickly. Cut your finger and put on an Elastoplast, keep it on for five days and the cut remains open, it requires air to heal. Fish live in water; they are the opposite of us. If I believed a gel would aid the fish any better than Klin-ik then we would sell a gel.

 

If it really does make your conscience feel better then use a gel but make sure that you have sterilized the area before hand with a safe searching antiseptic.

 

For cuts to ourselves we are told thoroughly clean the wound and then use a proprietary cream and if required a light breathable dressing. How can you thoroughly clean a puncture hole without a searching antiseptic? Gels and ointments will not penetrate down to the base of the wound such as a puncture. Some gels do nothing more than numb the tissue for a short period of time. Gels cement the wound preventing water from reaching surface and internal areas, which require healing. Regeneration of missing scales start by scabbing over, the scab or soft tissue is the birth of a new scale, which requires water to flourish without anything impeding the growth.

 

“I have noticed the odd fish flinch when I have applied the solution. Why?”

 

That is the signal that the solution has penetrated to the base of the wound, it only takes a second and then the fish calms down. Its similar to a cut finger, apply Dettol or TCP and it instantly stings as it sterilizes, but there is a lot more in Klin-Ik than just antiseptic. It contains an anti-parasiticide to ward off parasites that feast and breed on newly exposed tissue.

 

Two years ago I landed a Ribble chub that was in very poor condition. The creature was heavily infested with argulus, there must have been 30 or so feasting off its flanks. They leave behind a tunnel as they burrow through the upper layer of tissue. A drop of solution was placed at the tunnel entrance and rapidly seeped through. Boy, do those critters scuttle, and they don't like it.

 

Anglers say the treatment washes off after a period, that's why they use gels.

 

They think it does but that is only the visible carrier that washes off. Because it is water based product the essential ingredients are delivered immediately and absorbed into the cells/bloodstream. In the few seconds it takes to apply it will totally cleanse and sterilize the immediate area. There is no long or short-term advantage for the solution to remain on the fish, the job has been done within a split second and the fish's natural healing process will now get underway. Once it's sterilized it's sterilized, period!

 

It has been said that most fish will recover under their own natural healing process without medication.

 

That is perfectly true but what about the odd fish, the one in a hundred, the one in a thousand even. That particular fish could have the potential to reach a record-breaking size, it could be the fish of a lifetime. Some of you may be nodding your head saying yeah, but that's not the point; if that fish only grew to a maximum of 5lbs it still deserves a chance.

 

We don't know which particular fish will recover, nobody does, so why not treat every fish? All it takes is a couple of drops and it's nice to put something back into angling. In over 50 years of angling I have seen some sorry sights, horrendous growths not only around the mouth area but also body and fin infections. Science has come a long way since those early days so for the sake of a couple of drops or a quick wipe with a cotton bud why risk potentially unnecessary trauma, especially with potions from the dark ages?

 

“How long will a bottle of solution last and what is its shelf life?”

 

In one bottle there is enough medication to treat hundreds of fish, I have seen well meaning anglers literally swamping and almost bathing the fish in the solution. There is no need. All they are doing is wasting the product. The fish will come to no harm using excessive application, but in areas where scales and surface tissue remain undamaged and intact there is no requirement for treatment of any sort.

 

Shelf life is dependent on storage. As long as it is kept in cool conditions, fridge, garage floor, etc, it should remain effective for at least a couple of years.

 

Finally “Is there anything dangerous or harmful in it and why the green colour?”

 

The product is totally safe and environmentally friendly. Only a few weeks ago a very worried angler phoned me saying his toddler had just drank about a third of the bottle. Obviously being a concerned parent he was nearing a state of stress. We immediately assured him there would be no ill effects and instructed him to get his child to drink water, as in many cases this is normal practice. We then faxed his local hospital with a (C.O.S.H.H.) statement, which identifies the ingredients. The doctors assured him there was no undue cause for alarm. The only damage done was to leave a nasty taste in the mouth. Bet his little bread snatcher did not come back for seconds.

 

The greenish colour comes from our updated version, which contains the powerful anti-viral agent, which is all-important. One of our customers is the Environment Agency who buy it and issue it to their bailiffs to treat fish on public and private waters when on license checking duty. They also use it for obvious reasons to heal damaged and torn fins, lesions, etc, when netting is taken place. We also sell it to koi importers who often treat damaged fish especially following transportation from overseas.

 

There are no aniline dyes contained in the solution, there is not a single trace of malachite green or gentian violet in Klin-ik.

 

Regardless of market forces and the ever-changing pharmaceutical directives coming from Brussels we purposely keep down the price of the solution. The low price (which it is, if you knew the cost involved) of the product has been maintained over a ten-year period. That's my way of putting something back in the sport that has given me so much pleasure. We sell tens of thousands of bottles each year world wide without advertising; therefore we do not have to promote the product.

 

www.nashtackle.co.uk[/url]"]

 

Medicarp Ultra

Antiseptic gel specially formulated for fish treatment.

Keep a bottle with your sling, essential Kit for the caring carper.

Price £5.49

Nash Medicarp

Ryan westby | 2008-12-31

 

An important item that we should all carry with us.

Nash Medicarp is an antiseptic gel especially designed and formulated to treat the Carp’s wounds and help with the healing process.

We all like to catch carp when we go carp fishing. We should do our best to look after these magnificent fish. The Medicarp by Nash will help us all to look after the carp we catch time and time again and the best bit about the Medicarp gel it doesn’t cost much. Every angler on the bank should carry one.

It only takes a few seconds to use the Medicarp it forms a gel when it comes into contact with water which seals and protects the wound or ulcer when applied which speeds up healing.

 

Not a new bit of kit from Nash but an important one.

 

 

Korda Carp Care Kit

 

No angler should call themselves an angler if they knowingly return a fish with visible mouth or body damage without doing something to help that fish. We all put hooks in fish and we all see fish on the bank that have been damaged through previous captures or by nature.

The 'Carp Care Kit' is a must have item for any angler and was designed by Thinking Anglers. As a result Korda have taken it on in their range to ensure that it is distributed into every anglers tackle box. It comes complete with two bottles (MOUTH & BODY). The 'Mouth' bottle covers any cuts or damage in that area with the 'Body' bottle proving essential to treat, sore, cuts and other visible damage.

This product really does work and should be promoted as an essential item in any anglers tackle box. With just a smear of treatment on any visible injury, you're giving that fish the best possible chance of recovery.

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Just seen this. I don't rate the likes of Klinik - washes off to easily - the gels (think Nash does one) and certainly the ones used by Koi rearers seem a whole lot better.

 

I'm quite shocked to hear that some people use prescription medicines on carp! :shock:

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I have looked at the NASH Gel and was close to buying some till i read this

 

“Would you then use a sealant or gel?”

 

I would never use a gel or ointment. If I use a gel following hook removal I am sealing in the wound. Unless the hook was sterilized, which they cannot be after lying in silt or decaying matter, the puncture could already be harbouring harmful micro-organisms or any micro parasitic nasty leading to infection. The last thing I want is to lock in anything that could cause harm especially in an environment that has not been thoroughly cleaned.

 

I think il be going for either the Klin-ik or the Korda stuff, it maybe a little more expensive, but at least il know what im putting on the fish will do it some good

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I could follow that logic if it was mastic - but the whole idea of these things is that they are antibacterial! So the idea is that any "trapped" bugs are killed - and the gel prevents more penetrating.

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