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You wouldnt expect them to become stunted in such a large water (there must be a hell of alot in there if they have though) could be a few reasons for it, (1) there isnt much natural food in the water (2) a poor strain of carp to start of with?

 

Or there could just be alot around the 4 to 8lb mark and you have been unlucky not to catch any of the bigger one's yet :?:wink:

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I just found the answer to my own question. The state of Kansas pays a commercial fisherman to catch buffalo and common carp from Kansas reservoirs. The common carp are stunted in some reservoirs because there are to many. The buffalo are sold as food in New York and Chicago. The common carp are buried off site (no market for them). I wonder how they can be stunted when Kansas reservoirs are extremely fertile? :(

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I had no idea there were commercial fisherman in Kansas! I've fished Kansas for most of my life and haven't heard about that. I just put a post on the other message area about how to catch some larger carp. I've been catching a lot around 15 lbs but I know they get bigger than that where I'm fishing. I just need to figure out how to catch them!

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I've been fishing a 260 acre lake in a state park in Georgia (USA), and catching quite a few carp -- but I have yet to catch one larger than about 3 pounds (some were barely a pound).

I don't get constant action, so I don't believe the lake is overcrowded. The lake seems to be fertile enough, and I see empty mussel shells in the water, so I also believe that a lack of food is not the problem.

In past years (10-15 years ago), the lake has given up carp weighing in the high teens and low 20's, which leads me to believe the problem isn't one of poor genetics.

Very few people fish for carp in this lake. Most people fish for croppie, or bass, and to a lesser extent for catfish. Maybe there aren't enough predator fish to thin out the young carp, and therefore that's all I've caught so far?

Any other ideas??? Thanks!

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Gents,

While I'm not in USA, I seem to think that the average recommended stocking level for lakes in the UK is around the 800lb mark of fish (all species) per acre. Anything above that and obviously it would be overstocked as such, and the fish would become stunted.

 

Carp are also the most aggressive feeders when it is warm, eating pretty much anything food wise, although they are not predatory they will to some extent scavenge and feed of the spawn off other species

 

With few predators to thin them out they may well become overstocked and stunted. Also once a strain becomes stunted, further progeny seem to suffer from it unless mixed with fresh brood stock to respread the genetics.

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I think it's because in a lot of southern USA waters there's probably little predation for carp.  They quickly become too large for largemouth bass to feed on, and I've heard on a podcast that in muddy water carp are difficult for otters and pretty much everything else to catch.

Anecdotally you see some big carp farther north in USA, in water that is both clear, and home to large, fast hunters such as pike & muskie so this makes sense.

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