Jump to content
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Sign in to follow this  
grahamha

Best ways of playing carp?

Recommended Posts

hey i'm new to carping and am wondering what are the best ways of playing carp? should you be aiming to bring the carp to the surface of the water or keep them down? keep the rod tip as high as possible? and how tight should the drag be set?

 

sorry if it's a stupid question or has already been covered but i couldn't find anything when i did a search.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

pearsonaly i keep the rod tip fairly high but not two high and i reel and lower the rod and the stop reeling and raise the rod and so on...

never have the drag set to hard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi mate,

There seem to be a few theories regarding playing times bandying around the forum at the moment, however, there is no set way to do it, it just comes with experience. You don't want to bully the fish, hauling it in and causing undue stress and potential damage from it going mental on the bank. On the other hand however, playing a fish out for way too long can also cause harm to the fish through tiring it excessively.

Keeping the rod tip high can be a good idea near the end of the fight, when the carp is closer in, as I've found it helps to absorb any lunges that may occur.

As for the clutch, once again it comes down to personal preference. I like to back-wind whilst playing, with the clutch set to give line on any sudden lunges to avoid hook-pulls etc.

I hope that helps, but as with the vast majority of angling there is no set black and white method of playing fish, and of course practice makes perfect!

Andy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I often make reference to using your arm and rod, when playing a fish, being similar to the suspension on a bike or car....it comes with experience, but try and use your arm to cusion any movements of the fish, you can feel the fish and what it is doing through your arm.

 

As for the reel, everyone has a different method. I have always set the drag as low as possible, so that if the fish wants to run, it can. I make up the difference, if needed, by placing my thumb on the spool, to apply a "human" touch to the drag.

 

Main point....experience of catching fish is going to teach you more than anyone on this forum can.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do like to let the fish moreorless do its own thing, whilst gently applying pressure when necessary. That way the fish does'nt get spooky, but I'm always actually in control. I find they come to the net a lot easier that way.

 

Of course, when fishing locked up in really snaggy areas, there is'nt much time for niceties, but you can still minimise the stress.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I often make reference to using your arm and rod, when playing a fish, being similar to the suspension on a bike or car....it comes with experience, but try and use your arm to cusion any movements of the fish, you can feel the fish and what it is doing through your arm.

 

As for the reel, everyone has a different method. I have always set the drag as low as possible, so that if the fish wants to run, it can. I make up the difference, if needed, by placing my thumb on the spool, to apply a "human" touch to the drag.

 

Main point....experience of catching fish is going to teach you more than anyone on this forum can.

 

Good point about the arm mate, it does help a lot with cushioning the fight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous

Not at all. A good way to learn is by surface fishing with a good old hair rigged dog biscuit because the fish are lively from the outset. I had a few off the surface today but lost 4 to hook pulls. That's normal for the surface but as far as crayonhussy's analogy goes it's an excellent example.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The main thing with carp fishing and all big fish fishing, is to be able to adapt quickly to what ever is around you.

 

E.g. You think the fish is swimming "okay" towards you, and there is a hedge line to the side of where it is swimming, always keep it in mind that it could be looking for a little hole or root to burry its self in.

 

General tips:

 

Keep the rod high

NEVER let the line go slack

Make sure your clutch is set as appropriate

 

Good luck :)

Remember be adaptable!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was shown a trick a while ago by the famous author . He said if the carp gets into snags or won’t turn then bury the rod tip in the water. If you look at a Carps mouth it points downward so pulling the rod upwards is like trying to get the carp to do a back flip especially when hooked in the bottom lip. I tried this and it worked well. Also if you are lucky enough to hook two at once especially when using running rigs then don’t panic just take the bail arm of one rod whilst you play the other in. They rarely snag themselves and will often plod about in open water.

 

I have watched match anglers land relatively big carp quickly by using a low side strain. I know some bully the fish a bit too much but they often get the fish in before they know they are hooked.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not at all. A good way to learn is by surface fishing with a good old hair rigged dog biscuit because the fish are lively from the outset. I had a few off the surface today but lost 4 to hook pulls. That's normal for the surface but as far as crayonhussy's analogy goes it's an excellent example.

 

Four hook pulls in a day, that must have hurt, being as a couple of years ago in 25 years of fishing you had never had a hook pull :P

 

That's a bit of a sweeping statement R6, I've not had a hookpull or lost a fish for any other reason & have been fishing for 25 years. (sea & freshwater)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

During early and inexperienced days, set the clutch loose and go from there. The rod held high (as previously stated) is good advice, and ease the rod towards the fish when winding line back.

This will all seem billy basic in no time, but until then, its a good guide.

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think that I can really explain any better than anyone else as every fish is different.

 

I've had fish where I needed to keep the rod up as they moved around in front, yet at other times I've had to keep the rod low and parallel to the water as they kited to the left or right.

 

I've also had times where the rod tip has been submerged as I try to hold the fish away from trees overhanging the water either side.

 

Find what suits you, either clutch or backwind and then make sure you feel comfortable doing it. Practise with some smaller fish first, which can be more "ballistic runners" than "power pull" of a big carp, of course that is presuming that you can catch at all. :wink::lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I keep the rod tip high, maintain constant contact and pressure and use the direction of the rod to steer the fish. I have always used the drag on the reel and adjusted it as required during the fight, never been a fan of backwinding and always have it turned off, I know you have more control during a fight but iv always had more trouble with it than its worth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous
Not at all. A good way to learn is by surface fishing with a good old hair rigged dog biscuit because the fish are lively from the outset. I had a few off the surface today but lost 4 to hook pulls. That's normal for the surface but as far as crayonhussy's analogy goes it's an excellent example.

 

Four hook pulls in a day, that must have hurt, being as a couple of years ago in 25 years of fishing you had never had a hook pull :P

 

That's a bit of a sweeping statement R6, I've not had a hookpull or lost a fish for any other reason & have been fishing for 25 years. (sea & freshwater)

 

Blimey that must be about 2 & a half years ago but It's something I've had to get used to since changing to bigger more challenging waters... aint life a beach :x

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the only thing i'll add is keep calm :wink: its easy to get carried away if you find yourself attached to a good fish, i've fallen foul of this myself a few times in the past and ended up loosing the fish to a hook pull when i've panicked put too much pressure on :wink:

if i see i'm playing a good fish i consciously take a deep breath and tell myself to keep it steady and not apply any more pressure, its so easy to panic and blow it and the bigger the fish the bigger the risk you'll get carried away :wink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...